Cover for CAREY: Taking the Risk Out of Democracy: Corporate Propaganda versus Freedom and Liberty

Taking the Risk Out of Democracy

Corporate Propaganda versus Freedom and Liberty

This compelling book examines the twentieth-century history of corporate propaganda as practiced by U.S. businesses and its export to and adoption by other western democracies, chiefly the United Kingdom and Australia. A volume in the series The History of Communication, edited by Robert W. McChesney and John C. Nerone

"A uniquely important work on the 'ideal of a propaganda-managed democracy'."--Noam Chomsky "Illuminates how big business propaganda, waged by PR experts, subverts democracy and ensures corporate dominance."--John Stauber, coauthor of Toxic Sludge Is Good for You: Lies, Damn Lies and the Public Relations Industry "A unique study of the growth and development of corporate propaganda in western democracies. . . . Timely, and useful for anyone concerned about the influence of methods of mass persuasion in undermining democracy."--Elaine Bernard, Harvard University Trade Union Program

To order online:
http://www.press.uillinois.edu/books/catalog/32amb6ff9780252066160.html

To order by phone:
(800) 621-2736 (USA/Canada)
(773) 702-7000 (International)

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