Cover for GOMPERS: The Samuel Gompers Papers, Vol. 5: An Expanding Movement at the Turn of the Century, 1898-1902. Click for larger image

The Samuel Gompers Papers, Vol. 5

An Expanding Movement at the Turn of the Century, 1898-1902

The years 1898-1902 were prosperous for the U.S., marked by economic growth and industrial expansion, a rising material standard of living, and low unemployment. The period was one of unprecedented growth for the American Federation of Labor (AFL), and it found Samuel Gompers continuing to advocate the organization of all workers and focusing his efforts on establishment of local and national trade unions, central labor bodies, and state federations, and on the affiliation of these organizations with the AFL.

From reviews of earlier volumes

"This collection belongs on the shelf of anyone teaching American labor history, but it also should prove useful to scholars with related interests." -- James Grossman, Illinois Historical Journal

"Distinguished and invaluable. . . . Labor historians would be well advised to clear shelf space for it." -- Bruce Laurie, Industrial and Labor Relations Review

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http://www.press.uillinois.edu/books/catalog/46xdg5mx9780252020087.html

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Edited by Thomas Dublin