Cover for LECH: Broken Soldiers. Click for larger image

Broken Soldiers

The never-before-revealed true story and final chapter of what really happened to American POWs in Korea, how they survived in the face of unimaginable brutality and “programming” and how so many came to be “broken soldiers.”

Traversing the no-man's-land of political loyalty and betrayal, Broken Soldiers documents the fierce battle for the minds and hearts of American prisoners during the Korean War. In scorching detail, Raymond Lech describes the soldiers' day-to-day experiences in prisoner-of-war camps and the shocking treatment some of them received at the hands of their own countrymen after the war. Why, he asks, were only fourteen American soldiers tried as collaborators when thousands of others who admitted to some of the same offenses were not?

Drawing on some 60,000 pages of court-martial transcripts Lech secured through the Freedom of Information Act, Broken Soldiers documents the appalling treatment and the sophisticated propagandizing to which American POWs fell victim during the Korean conflict. Three thousand American soldiers perished in North Korean camps over the winter of 1950-51, most from starvation. Through the unsentimental testimony of survivors, Lech describes how these young men, filthy and lice-infested, lost an average of 40 percent of their body weight. Many also lost their powers of resistance and their grip on soldierly conduct.

After six months of starvation, the emaciated, disoriented prisoners were subjected to a relentless campaign to educate them to the virtues of communism. Bombarded with propaganda, the Americans were organized into study groups and forced to discuss and write about communism and Marxism, even to broadcast harangues against capitalist aggression and appeals for an end to the war.

Lech traces the spiral of debilitation and compromise, showing how parroting certain phrases came to seem a small price to pay for physical safety. Threatened with starvation and indefinite confinement in Korea, many POWs succumbed to pressure to mouth communist slogans and provide information far in excess of the regulation "name, rank, and service number."

Of the thousands of American soldiers who, while prisoners in North Korea, spoke and wrote favorably of communism and disparaged their country, a handful were charged with collaborating with the enemy. Why were so few singled out? Why did each branch of the armed services judge parallel circumstances differently, and why were American soldiers not realistically prepared for capture? A powerful indictment of justice miscarried, Broken Soldiers raises troubling questions that remain unanswered decades after the events.

To order online:
http://www.press.uillinois.edu/books/catalog/82ash9mk9780252025419.html

To order by phone:
(800) 621-2736 (USA/Canada)
(773) 702-7000 (International)

Related Titles

previous book next book
Digital Depression

Information Technology and Economic Crisis

Dan Schiller

The Civil War Diary of Gideon Welles, Lincoln's Secretary of the Navy

The Original Manuscript Edition

Gideon Welles Edited by William E. Gienapp and Erica L. Gienapp

Redeeming Time

Protestantism and Chicago’s Eight-Hour Movement, 1866-1912

William A. Mirola

NFL Football

A History of America's New National Pastime

Richard C. Crepeau

Jane Addams in the Classroom

Edited by David Schaafsma

History of the Present

Joan W.Scott, Andrew Aisenberg, Brian Connolly, Ben Kafka, Sylvia Schafer, & Mrinalini Sinha

American Journal of Psychology

Edited by Robert W. Proctor

Behind the Gas Mask

The U.S. Chemical Warfare Service in War and Peace

Thomas I. Faith

The Neighborhood Outfit

Organized Crime in Chicago Heights

Louis Corsino

Winning the War for Democracy

The March on Washington Movement, 1941-1946

David Lucander