Cover for Harris: Sex Workers, Psychics, and Numbers Runners: Black Women in New York City's Underground Economy. Click for larger image
Ebook Information

Sex Workers, Psychics, and Numbers Runners

Black Women in New York City's Underground Economy
Awards and Recognition:

• Darlene Clark Hine Award, Organization of American Historians (OAH), 2017

How the underground economy helped African American women rise above

During the early twentieth century, a diverse group of African American women carved out unique niches for themselves within New York City's expansive informal economy. LaShawn Harris illuminates the labor patterns and economic activity of three perennials within this kaleidoscope of underground industry: sex work, numbers running for gambling enterprises, and the supernatural consulting business.

Mining police and prison records, newspaper accounts, and period literature, Harris teases out answers to essential questions about these women and their working lives. She also offers a surprising revelation. Harris argues that the underground economy catalyzed working-class black women's creation of the employment opportunities, occupational identities, and survival strategies that provided them with financial stability and a sense of labor autonomy and mobility. At the same time, Harris shows, urban black women strove for economic and social prospects and pleasures, and in the process experienced the conspicuous and hidden dangers associated with newfound labor opportunities.

"This outstanding first monograph by historian Harris continues Deborah Gray White's 1987 call for historians to reclaim the voices of African American women lost in the margins. . . . Highly Recommended."--Choice

"A stunning achievement that makes an incisive contribution to African American studies and history, black women's history, and gender and sexuality studies as well as works that explore crime and vice. Harris's powerful book sheds a light on groups rarely studied and it will complicate readers's understanding of terms such as illegal, extralegal, and informal."--Kali Gross, author of Colored Amazons: Crime, Violence, and Black Women in the City of Brotherly Love, 18801910

"This book is a well-researched and valuable perspective on black women's labor in New York City's early-twentieth-century informal economy. Such a groundbreaking study provides new insights about the existence, relevance, and diversity within the informal economy through a racialized and gendered lens. An impressive work of original research and analysis in African-American, urban, labor, and gender history."--Cheryl D. Hicks, author of Talk with You Like a Woman: African American Women, Justice, and Reform in New York, 1890-1935

Publication of this book was supported by funding from the Morrill Fund, Department of History, Michigan State University

LaShawn Harris is an assistant professor of history at Michigan State University.

To order online:
http://www.press.uillinois.edu/books/catalog/83wwx4kx9780252040207.html

To order by phone:
(800) 621-2736 (USA/Canada)
(773) 702-7000 (International)

Related Titles

previous book next book
Lost in the USA

American Identity from the Promise Keepers to the Million Mom March

Deborah Gray White

May Irwin

Singing, Shouting, and the Shadow of Minstrelsy

Sharon Ammen

Daughter of the Empire State

The Life of Judge Jane Bolin

Jacqueline A. McLeod

Humane Insight

Looking at Images of African American Suffering and Death

Courtney R. Baker

Along the Streets of Bronzeville

Black Chicago's Literary Landscape

Elizabeth Schroeder Schlabach

Beyond Respectability

The Intellectual Thought of Race Women

Brittney C. Cooper

Framing the Black Panthers

The Spectacular Rise of a Black Power Icon

Jane Rhodes

Colored No More

Reinventing Black Womanhood in Washington, D.C.

Treva B. Lindsey

Women, Gender, and Families of Color

Edited by Jennifer F. Hamer

Detroit's Cold War

The Origins of Postwar Conservatism

Colleen Doody

Globetrotting

African American Athletes and Cold War Politics

Damion L. Thomas

Football and Manliness

An Unauthorized Feminist Account of the NFL

Thomas P. Oates

Black Music Research Journal

Edited by Horace Maxile, Jr.

Black Post-Blackness

The Black Arts Movement and Twenty-First-Century Aesthetics

Margo Natalie Crawford

 
Sex Workers, Psychics, and Numbers Runners ebook is available for immediate download from the following vendors:
Amazon.com
Barnes & Noble
Kobo
Google Play