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Ebook Information

Indigenous Women and Work

From Labor to Activism
Awards and Recognition:

A Choice Outstanding Title, 2013.

The working lives of Indigenous women

The essays in Indigenous Women and Work create a transnational and comparative dialogue on the history of the productive and reproductive lives and circumstances of Indigenous women from the late nineteenth century to the present in the United States, Australia, New Zealand/Aotearoa, and Canada. Surveying the spectrum of Indigenous women's lives and circumstances as workers, both waged and unwaged, the contributors offer varied perspectives on the ways women's work has contributed to the survival of communities in the face of ongoing tensions between assimilation and colonization. They also interpret how individual nations have conceived of Indigenous women as workers and, in turn, convert these assumptions and definitions into policy and practice. The essays address the intersection of Indigenous, women's, and labor history, but will also be useful to contemporary policy makers, tribal activists, and Native American women's advocacy associations.

Contributors are Tracey Banivanua Mar, Marlene Brant Castellano, Cathleen D. Cahill, Brenda J. Child, Sherry Farrell Racette, Chris Friday, Aroha Harris, Faye HeavyShield, Heather A. Howard, Margaret D. Jacobs, Alice Littlefield, Cybčle Locke, Mary Jane Logan McCallum, Kathy M'Closkey, Colleen O'Neill, Beth H. Piatote, Melissa Rohde, Susan Roy, Lynette Russell, Joan Sangster, Ruth Taylor, and Carol Williams.

"Readers in search of compelling works in the fields of indigenous studies, women's studies, and women's history will find this work to be an absolute treasure. Recommended."--Choice

"This intellectually engaging anthology compiles an excellent array of essays revolving around Indigenous women's relation to labor in the United States, Australia, New Zealand, and Canada. The geographic range allows the reader to see the commonalities and differences between women's work experiences in these various national contexts."--Renya K. Ramirez, coeditor of Gendered Citizenships: Transnational Perspectives on Knowledge Production, Political Activism, and Culture

Publication supported by Trent University

Carol Williams is an associate professor of women and gender studies and history at the University of Lethbridge in Alberta, Canada, and the author of Framing the West: Race, Gender and the Photographic Frontier in the Pacific Northwest.

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