FSMW Deadline Extended to April 15, 2014

It’s not too late to submit your proposal for the 2014 Folklore Studies in Multicultural World author workshop. We have extended the deadline to April 15, 2014, and invite submissions from authors with first-book projects in folklore broadly construed. This year’s workshop will be held November 5 as part of the American Folklore Society’s annual meeting in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Please see our submission guidelines and contact us if you have any questions.

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CFP 2014 FSMW Workshop

Call for Book Proposals: Folklore Studies in a Multicultural World

The University of Illinois Press, the University Press of Mississippi, and the University of Wisconsin Press, in cooperation with the American Folklore Society and with the support of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, are collaborating to host an author’s workshop at the 2013 conference of the American Folklore Society for authors working on their first book. Up to six authors will be selected to participate in a full day of intensive activities devoted to critiquing and developing their individual projects. Workshop activities will include one-on-one mentoring sessions with editors and senior scholars and group discussions of revision and editing strategies, publishing processes, and project critiques. A modest stipend will be provided to participants to help defray the costs of attending the workshop.

This opportunity is open only to authors preparing their first books. Projects must be single-authored, nonfiction books based on folklore research. Edited volumes, photography collections with minimal text, and memoirs will not be considered.

Projects selected for the workshop will be candidates for publication in the Presses’ new collaborative series, Folklore Studies in a Multicultural World, which aims to publish exceptional first books that emphasize the interdisciplinary and/or international nature of the field of folklore. Within the series, each Press will focus on specific aspects of folklore studies related to its areas of expertise: Illinois on gender and queer studies, world folk cultures, and multiculturalism as manifested in forms of vernacular expression such as music, dance, and foodways; Mississippi in folk art, American folk music, African American studies, popular culture, and Southern folklife; and Wisconsin in folklore studies that intersect with Upper Midwest cultures, Irish/Irish-American studies, Jewish studies, Southeast Asian studies, gay/lesbian studies, foodways, and travel. Applicants may indicate in their proposal whether they have a preference of publisher.

Books in the series include Squeeze This! A Cultural History of the Accordion in America by Marion Jacobson, The Jumbies’ Playing Ground: Old World Influences on Afro-Creole Masquerades in the Eastern Caribbean by Robert Wyndham Nicholls, The Painted Screens of Baltimore: An Urban Folk Revealed by Elaine Eff, and The Last Laugh: Folk Humor, Celebrity Culture, and Mass-Mediated Disasters in the Digital Age by Trevor Blank.

Proposals should be submitted via e-mail at any time until the deadline of April 1, 2014, to fsmw@uillinois.edu. For submission guidelines, please see http://folklorestudies.press.illinois.edu/guidelines.html.

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JOIN US! FSMW Reception at AFS: Thursday at 4 PM in the Exhibit Hall

Are you going to be at the annual meeting of the American Folklore Society next week? If so, then join us for a reception at 4 PM in the exhibit hall at the FSMW table on Thursday, October 17. We’re excited to head to Providence, Rhode Island, for the AFS meeting and the fifth Folklore Studies in a Multicultural World series workshop, where we’ve invited six authors with exciting projects. The small reception at the conference will also be a book launch for Trevor Blank’s The Last Laugh and Elaine Eff’s The Painted Screens of Baltimore. If you will be attending the conference, we’ll hope to see you at the reception, and we’ll look forward to hearing about your interests regarding the FSMW series.

If you aren’t able to make the reception, we do hope you’ll stop by the FSMW exhibit at some point during the meeting to take a look at the latest books in the series. Safe travels!

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Elaine Eff’s Painted Screens of Baltimore Next Book in Series

The Painted Screens of Baltimore: An Urban Folk Art Revealed

By Elaine Eff

An exploration of a homegrown tradition of unexpected beauty and privacy

University Press of Mississippi
Folklore Studies in a Multicultural World

Cloth $35
Also available as an Ebook

 

 

Painted screens have long been synonymous in the popular imagination with the Baltimore rowhouse. At once picturesque, practical, and quirky, window and door screens adorned with scenic views simultaneously offer privacy and ventilation in crowded neighborhoods.

As an urban folk art, painted screens flourished in Baltimore, though they did not originate there—precursors date to early eighteenth-century London. They were a fixture on fine homes and businesses in Europe and America throughout the Victorian era. But as the handmade screen yielded to industrial production, the whimsical artifact of the elite classes was suddenly transformed into an item for mass consumption. Historic examples are now a rarity, but in Baltimore the folk art is still very much alive.

The Painted Screens of Baltimore: An Urban Folk Art Revealed (University Press of Mississippi) takes a first look at this beloved icon of one major American city through the words and images of dozens of self-taught artists. Author Elaine Eff, an authority on the subject of painted screens, examines the roots of painted wire cloth, the ethnic communities where painted screens have been at home for a century, and the future of this art form.

Many screen artists trace their creations to the capable and unlikely brush of one Bohemian immigrant, William Oktavec. In 1913, this corner grocer began a family dynasty and inspired generations of artists who continue his craft to this day. The Painted Screens of Baltimore is the first book written on the subject. Beautifully illustrated, the book includes 175 black and white and color photographs.

Elaine Eff, Baltimore, Maryland, is the authority on painted screens. A curator and filmmaker, she has chronicled and conserved living culture as the folklorist for the city of Baltimore and the State of Maryland.

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Dispatch from Grenada

the following contains an excerpt from a post from the University Press of Mississippi Blog June 12, 2013

I was in Grenada as part of a broader effort called Folklore Studies in a Multicultural World, a book series that publishes top-notch first books in folklore studies. Funded by a generous grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the series is a collaborative venture of the University of Illinois Press, the University Press of Mississippi, and the University of Wisconsin Press, in conjunction with the American Folklore Society.

Mainly, we were promoting our recent book The Jumbies’ Playing Ground: Old World Influences on Afro-Creole Masquerades in the Eastern Caribbean, part of the Folklore Studies in a Multicultural World series mentioned above.

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Proud to Announce our FSMW 2013 Workshop Participants

We are excited to announce the finalists for the 2013 FSMW Workshop, which will take place at the AFS annual meeting in Providence, Rhode Island. We received a great many interesting projects, and after reviewing the material carefully, the three participating presses, The University of Illinois Press, The University Press of Mississippi, and The University of Wisconsin Press, have selected the six authors and projects who will participate in this year’s workshop. The sponsoring presses congratulate:

Fiona-Jane Brown: “Faith, Fear and Folk Narrative: Belief and Identity in Scottish Fishing Communities” (Univ. of Wisconsin Press)

Robin Harris: “The Sakha Olonkho: Safeguarding a Siberian Epic Storytelling Tradition” (Univ. of Illinois Press)

Nadia Inserra: “Reimagining the Italian South: the Tarantella Music and Dance Revival from Italy to the US” (Univ. of Illinois Press)

Ellen McHale: “Stable Views: Voices and Stories from the Thoroughbred Racetrack” (Univ. Press of Mississippi)

Claire Schmidt: “Laughter Behind Bars: The Occupational Humor of White Midwestern Prison Workers” (Univ. of Wisconsin Press)

Irene Watt: “The Power of the Lullaby” (Univ. Press of Mississippi)

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Marion Jacobson in New York Times Arts Section

We are always delighted to get news about the people who are part of the Folklore Studies in a Multicultural World network. Marion Jacobson, author of Squeeze This! A Cultural History of the Accordion in America, was recently interviewed for a feature in the New York Times Arts section. Check out the article “Showing Off the Accordion’s Hip Side.”

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FSMW 2013 Deadline Extended to April 15

It’s not too late to submit your proposal for the 2013 Folklore Studies in Multicultural World author workshop. We have extended the deadline to April 15, 2013, and invite submissions from authors with first-book projects in folklore broadly construed. This year’s workshop will be held October 16 as part of the American Folklore Society’s annual meeting in Providence, Rhode Island. Please see our submission guidelines and contact us if you have any questions.

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REMINDER: Calling All Proposals!

The deadline to submit your proposals for the 2013 Folklore Studies in Multicultural World workshop is right around the corner on April 1, 2013. As usual, this year’s workshop will be conducted at the American Folklore Society annual meeting, which will be held in Providence, Rhode Island. As of now, we have a modest stack of proposals, and we are eager to dive into them! Please review our submission guidelines and contact us if you have any questions. Tthis is an exciting time of year for us, and we always look forward to the diversity of the projects we receive.

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Trevor J. Blank’s The Last Laugh

Q: What’s the difference between Michael Jackson and Farrah Fawcett?
A: About three hours.The Last Laugh

Widely publicized in mass media worldwide, high-profile tragedies and celebrity scandals—the untimely deaths of Michael Jackson and Princess Diana, the embarrassing affairs of Tiger Woods and President Clinton, the 9/11 attacks or the Challenger space shuttle explosion—often provoke nervous laughter and black humor. If in the past this snarky folklore may have been shared among friends and uttered behind closed doors, today the Internet’s ubiquity and instant interactivity propels such humor across a much more extensive and digitally mediated discursive space. New media not only let more people “in on the joke,” but they have also become the “go-to” formats for engaging in symbolic interaction, especially in times of anxiety or emotional suppression, by providing users an expansive forum for humorous, combative, or intellectual communication, including jokes that cross the line of propriety and good taste.

Moving through engaging case studies of Internet-derived humor about momentous disasters in recent American popular culture and history, The Last Laugh chronicles how and why new media have become a predominant means of vernacular expression. Trevor J. Blank argues that computer-mediated communication has helped to compensate for users’ sense of physical detachment in the “real” world, while generating newly meaningful and dynamic opportunities for the creation and dissemination of folklore. Drawing together recent developments in new media studies with the analytical tools of folklore studies, he makes a strong case for the significance to contemporary folklore of technologically driven trends in folk and mass culture.

Trevor J. Blank is visiting assistant professor in the Department of English and Communication at SUNY Potsdam. He is editor of the e-journal New Directions in Folklore and of the books Folklore and the Internet: Vernacular Expression in a Digital World and Folk Culture in the Digital Age: The Emergent Dynamics of Human Interaction.

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