Category Archives: Appalachian studies

One man’s opinion: if I had to choose the hardest gig in show business or performance, without a doubt I would say “comedian.” It is hard to spin a funny story. It is hard to tell a joke. It is hard … Continue reading

The National Barn Dance was the nation’s most popular country music radio show during the 1930s and 1940s, predating the popularity of the Grand Ole Opry and serving as a precursor to the youth movement of that rose with rock … Continue reading

The Organization of American Historians Annual Meeting in Providence, Rhode Island, April 7-10, 2016 was a great opportunity for editors and staff from the Press to congregate with people in the field of history (and perhaps check into future acquisitions … Continue reading

Word comes from the Library of Congress that twenty-five selections have been added to the National Recording Registry. While the likes of Merle Haggard and the unstoppable Gloria Gaynor will no doubt get the headlines, we at the UIP Palace of Sounds … Continue reading

Studying Appalachian Studies: Making the Path by Walking, edited by Chad Berry, Phillip J. Obermiller, and Shaunna L. Scott has been awarded the Weatherford Award in non-fiction by Berea College and the Appalachian Studies Association. The award is given to … Continue reading

Appalachia is one of those words that encompasses a universe and leaves each of us to form our own ideas of what it means. For me, to use one example, Appalachia ties into the back-to-the-earth movement popular when I was … Continue reading