Tag Archives: Abraham Lincoln

Today marks the birthday of Daniel Chester French, in his day one of America’s most popular sculptors. The famed often seem to have known the famed, and French was no different. May Alcott, Louisa’s sister, was the person who encouraged … Continue reading

New in paperback, Herndon’s Lincoln offers today’s readers the most influential biography of the Railsplitter ever published. William H. Herndon aspired to write a faithful portrait of his friend and law partner, Abraham Lincoln, based on his own observations and on … Continue reading

Making Photography Matter: A Viewer’s History from the Civil War to the Great Depression by Cara A. Finnegan was recently awarded the James A. Winans and Herbert A. Wichelns Memorial Award for Distinguished Scholarship in Rhetoric and Public Address from … Continue reading

Seven-year-old Jesse W. Weik was in the crowd when Abraham Lincoln’s funeral train passed through Indianapolis on its way to Springfield. Weik’s father, an immigrant baker and grocer, lifted his son to see the late president’s body. Years later, the … Continue reading

Presidents have the unique perspective on other presidents. After all, a president—living or dead, current or former—belongs to a club that remains very small, and intimately knows a job that’s unlike any other. William Henry Herndon, author of the new UIP … Continue reading

The UIP publishes lots of books on Abraham Lincoln. You might think: can’t you be more contemporary? John Wilkes Booth assassinated the poor man 150-some odd years ago. But the Railsplitter remains newsworthy. Dateline: Kankakee, Illinois, where a thief or thieves have stolen … Continue reading

On August 21, 1858 upstart challenger Abraham Lincoln entered into the first of seven debates with incumbent Senator Stephen Douglas in Ottawa, Illinois. Lincoln was challenging Douglas to represent Illinois in the U.S. Senate. The now-famous Lincoln-Douglas debates didn’t propel … Continue reading

Three UIP titles are available in paperback editions today. Locomotive to Aeromotive: Octave Chanute and the Transportation Revolution Earth, water, air—Octave Chanute grappled with the very elements themselves. He built the massive Chicago and Kansas City stockyards, bridged the so-called unbridgeable Missouri … Continue reading