Tag Archives: food history

There’s nothing more American than soft-serve ice cream. It provides the dairy and sweetness we crave in an attractive shape atop a sugary cone that encourages mobility. And we dispense the tasty snack via a machine that smashes it with compressed … Continue reading

It’s one of the happiest days of the faux-holiday calendar, a day when you can splurge on a couple of delicious frankfurters loaded up with all your favorite toppings. The hot dog, perhaps our most all-American sausage product, is both … Continue reading

September 22 is an auspicious date in Illinois history. As this post recounts, boxing history took place on the date. In 1985, Willie Nelson teamed with John Mellencamp and Neil Young to put up the first Farm Aid extravaganza at … Continue reading

Horseradish sparks opinions as strong as its taste. Most people, truth to tell, want nothing to do with the root in its fiery, ground-up form. Their relationship to horseradish rests mainly on acting horrified when Uncle Frank dashes some onto his roast … Continue reading

Drink bothered the Founding Fathers. Not on a personal level, of course. John Adams drank a tankard of hard cider with his breakfast and George Washington went on many a bender. No, they saw boozing as a threat to the good functioning of … Continue reading

Food historian and travel writer Cynthia Clampitt recently answered some questions about her book Midwest Maize: How Corn Shaped the U.S. Heartland. Q: What was the importance of corn to Native Americas before European contact? Cynthia Clampitt: To a certain … Continue reading

You should eat. In From the Jewish Heartland, noshers and freshers alike can explore Jewish culinary innovation, Midwest style. Ellen F. Steinberg and Jack H. Prost curate treasures uncovered in Jewish homemakers’ handwritten manuscripts and notebooks, published journals and newspaper … Continue reading

Whether you want to feed the mind or the body, the UI Press steadily serves up titles in food studies and culinary history that offer astounding insights on our eats. Indeed, we wouldn’t think of printing a Best of Illinois regional catalog without giving you … Continue reading