Tag Archives: journalism

Headed to AEJMC next week? Here are five books to keep on your radar as you peruse the exhibit hall: 1. Interactive Journalism: Hackers, Data, and Code By Nikki Usher “In Interactive Journalism, Nikki Usher skillfully answers three questions rarely addressed at the … Continue reading

New in stores, Mister Pulitzer and the Spider marks the release of a truly monumental reconsideration of what journalism’s journey from the 1800s to today. A spidery network of mobile online media has supposedly changed people, places, time, and their meanings. … Continue reading

In the second half of the nineteenth century, Americans swarmed to take in a raft of new illustrated journals and papers. Engravings and drawings of “buckskinned braves” and “Indian princesses” proved an immensely popular attraction for consumers of publications like … Continue reading

One of the pleasures of reading Hillary Clinton in the News is the trip back to yesteryear to see the freaks and embarrassments who made up the American media’s infotainment complex at the turn of the century—and to wonder that … Continue reading

Investment and expansion have made Turkish media a transnational powerhouse in the Middle East and Central Asia. Yet tensions continue to grow between media outlets and the Islamist AKP party that has governed the country for over a decade. In … Continue reading

The professional judgment of gatekeepers defined the American news agenda for decades.  Making the News Popular, now available from the University of Illinois Press, examines how subsequent events brought on a post-professional period that opened the door for imagining that consumer … Continue reading

Some background on this weekend’s events from the new University of Illinois book Media in New Turkey: The Origins of an Authoritarian Neoliberal State, by Bilge Yesil. While the Turkish model was drawing praise, the country was indeed experiencing serious … Continue reading

Generally considered a bummer of epic proportions, the Great Depression nonetheless inspired a measure of nostalgia. Americans looked back to a simpler time, of lives unencumbered by food, employment, homes, or arable Great Plains farmland. Liberals celebrated the halcyon days … Continue reading

Seeing, for many, is believing. Authors Matthew C. Ehrlich and Joe Saltzman have taken a look at how we see news gatherers and the news business in television, film, radio, novels, comics, plays, and other media. In the introduction to … Continue reading

In a century-plus of popular culture, journalists have appeared as cynical scandalmongers, noble crusaders, nicotine-soaked cynics, and the mild-mannered alter egos of super-powered Kryptonians. The latest UIP debut Heroes and Scoundrels covers the whole waterfront of newspersons depicted in our pop … Continue reading