Tag Archives: labor studies

Although the most visible banners of feminism were carried by educated, white-collar, professional women, in fact, working-class women were a powerful force in the campaign for gender equality. “Rights, Not Roses” explores how unionized wage-earning women led the struggle to … Continue reading

It is International Women’s Day, comrade! By universal proclamation we honor women and dedicate ourselves to helping them overcome the many obstacles they still face in this man’s world. Indeed, some people intend to observe the day with A Day Without … Continue reading

In recent years, China’s leaders have taken decisive action to transform information, communications, and technology (ICT) into the nation’s next pillar industry. In Networking China, Yu Hong offers an overdue examination of that burgeoning sector’s political economy. Hong focuses on … Continue reading

Two more authors added their excellent works to the UIP trophy case, a piece of furniture already fill to burstin’ in recent weeks. Christina Sunardi won the Philip Brett Award from the LBTQ Study Group of the American Musicological Society (AMS) for … Continue reading

Excerpted from the new UIP book Goodbye iSlave, by Jack Linchuan Qiu. Hans Rollman at PopMatters reviewed the book here. Welcome to a brave New World of profit making, propelled by high technology, guarded by enterprising authority, carried forward by millions of … Continue reading

Civic Labors . . . is intended to prompt further discussion about engaged scholarship and teaching. The essays will help readers to think further about the theory and practices of engagement and scholar-activism, asking what publics ought to be addressed … Continue reading

How do we lift the silicon heel from the lives of the exploited workers who make our gadgets? Jack Linchuan Qiu‘s insightful and enraging new book Goodbye iSlave delves into one of the most important, and willfully overlooked, moral issues of our time. … Continue reading

Religion has played a protean role in the lives of America’s workers. Matthew Pehl focuses on Detroit to examine the religious consciousness constructed by the city’s working-class Catholics, African American Protestants, and southern-born white evangelicals and Pentecostals between 1910 and … Continue reading

For years, native Hawaiians had fought with a modest degree of success to maintain their autonomy. But in 1893, white businessmen—sugar magnates and the like—had taken control by tossing out Hawaii’s last monarch and organizing their own provisional government. Not … Continue reading