Tag Archives: slavery

On January 21, 1972, DC Comics declared the largely misnamed Metropolis, Illinois the official home town of Superman. Metropolis had already adopted the Son of Krypton, and as we all know the local paper famously called itself the Planet as a … Continue reading

Excerpted from Slavery at Sea: Terror, Sex, and Sickness in the Middle Passage, by Sowande’ M. Mustakeem The nature of slavery inflicted permanent scars as traders moved purchased captives off land, separating married couples, parents and children, siblings, and other … Continue reading

History of the Present, launched in 2010, is devoted to history as a critical endeavor. Its aim is twofold: to create a space in which scholars can reflect on the role history plays in establishing categories of contemporary debate by … Continue reading

Excerpted from the new UIP book Goodbye iSlave, by Jack Linchuan Qiu. Hans Rollman at PopMatters reviewed the book here. Welcome to a brave New World of profit making, propelled by high technology, guarded by enterprising authority, carried forward by millions of … Continue reading

How do we lift the silicon heel from the lives of the exploited workers who make our gadgets? Jack Linchuan Qiu‘s insightful and enraging new book Goodbye iSlave delves into one of the most important, and willfully overlooked, moral issues of our time. … Continue reading

The new UIP release Slavery at Sea examines the infamous Middle Passage in a new light. Sowande’ Mustakeem reveals for the first time how slavery took critical shape at sea. Expanding the gaze even more deeply, the book centers how the oceanic transport … Continue reading

The Zika virus. It’s making headlines and provoking anxieties. A disease-causing pathogen carried by Aedes mosquitoes—the culprits behind yellow fever, dengue, and chikungunya, among other ills—Zika was isolated in Uganda in the 1940s. Mosquitoes being mosquitoes, and humans having the habit … Continue reading

Daisy Turner, the shotgun-wielding centenarian, was someone Jane Beck was anxious to meet. Beck, the Executive Director Emeritus and Founder of the Vermont Folklife Center, recounted her first encounter with Daisy Turner on the Vermont PBS program Connect. “First and foremost, she was … Continue reading

Daisy Turner was a woman of many words. The storyteller and poet was a living repository of history. She related the stories of her own family, from the abduction of her ancestors in West Africa to her own upbringing in … Continue reading

Collaborators for Emancipation is an examination of the relationship between President Abraham Lincoln and Congregational minister Owen Lovejoy. Authors William F. Moore and Jane Ann Moore collaborated themselves on both the book and answering some questions for the UIP blog. … Continue reading