Tag Archives: women’s studies

The hit film Hidden Figures re-acquainted the zeitgeist with the idea that women in general, and African American women in particular, have long participated in scientific endeavor. Science on the Home Front tells women’s story during the critical years of World War II, when Leona … Continue reading

Widely regarded as one of the most innovative and passionate filmmakers working in France today, Claire Denis has continued to make beautiful and challenging films since the 1988 release of her first feature, Chocolat. Judith Mayne‘s comprehensive study of these … Continue reading

Although the most visible banners of feminism were carried by educated, white-collar, professional women, in fact, working-class women were a powerful force in the campaign for gender equality. “Rights, Not Roses” explores how unionized wage-earning women led the struggle to … Continue reading

It is International Women’s Day, comrade! By universal proclamation we honor women and dedicate ourselves to helping them overcome the many obstacles they still face in this man’s world. Indeed, some people intend to observe the day with A Day Without … Continue reading

Two more authors added their excellent works to the UIP trophy case, a piece of furniture already fill to burstin’ in recent weeks. Christina Sunardi won the Philip Brett Award from the LBTQ Study Group of the American Musicological Society (AMS) for … Continue reading

Awards season continues with one of our already-lauded books receiving another prize. L. H. Stallings‘s Funk the Erotic: Transaesthetics and Black Sexual Cultures has won the Alan Bray Memorial Book Award, awarded by the GL/Q Caucus of the Modern Language Association … Continue reading

Holly Welker, author of Baring Witness, recently sat down for a radio interview with the National Public Radio affiliate in Phoenix. Want an enlightening look at the world of Mormon marriage from women’s point of view? Tune in for the in-depth discussion … Continue reading

Women filing gender-based asylum claims long faced skepticism and outright rejection within the U.S. immigration system. Despite erratic progress, the United States still fails to recognize gender as an established category for experiencing persecution. Gender exists in a sort of … Continue reading

In the new UIP release Splattered Ink, Sarah Whitney explores postfeminist gothic, that blockbuster-laden, Oprah-sanctified genre literary that jars readers, rejects happy endings (and beginnings), and finds powerful new ways to talk about violence against women. The genre in particular challenges postfeminist … Continue reading

One of this month’s new UIP releases, Splattered Ink is a bold analysis of postfeminist gothic, a literary genre that continues to jar readers, reject happy endings, and find powerful new ways to talk about violence against women. Sarah E. Whitney … Continue reading