Category Archives: immigration

For many, it is impossible to ignore what is happening in the United States right now. As thousands of families have been separated at the border, many of us have questions. As a scholarly press, we strive to disseminate significant … Continue reading

Himanee Gupta-Carlson is an associate professor at SUNY Empire State College. She recently answered some questions about her new book, Muncie, India(na): Middletown and Asian America. Q. Muncie, Indiana is well-known for being the site of the famous Middletown Studies, … Continue reading

Laura E. Ruberto is a professor of Humanities at Berkeley City College in the Department of Arts and Cultural studies, and Joseph Sciorra is the Director for Academic and Cultural Programs at the John D Calandra Italian American Institute at Queens College, City … Continue reading

On May 5, 2001, the village of Fulton officially opened the majestic De Immigrant, the 100-foot tall Dutch windmill overlooking the Mississippi River. Built in the Netherlands and reconstructed piece-by-piece by native craftspersons, De Immigrant marked its grand opening by grinding … Continue reading

Today at The Point, José Ángel N. contributes an essay drawing on his experiences as an undocumented immigrant to ponder American progress, the idea of home, and today’s fraught immigration atmosphere. When I am invited to share my experience as … Continue reading

Forbidden Relatives challenges the belief—widely held in the United States—that legislation against marriage between first cousins is based on a biological risk to offspring. In fact, its author maintains, the U.S. prohibition against such unions originated largely because of the … Continue reading

This classic on space travel was first published in 1953, when interplanetary space flight was considered science fiction by most of those who considered it at all. Here the German-born scientist Wernher von Braun detailed what he believed were the … Continue reading

Winner of the Association for Asian American Studies Book Award, Survivors follows the saga of Cambodian refugees striving to distance themselves from a series of cataclysmic events in their homeland. Sucheng Chan tracks not only the Cambodians’ fight for life … Continue reading

Pretty much every world religion and ethical system makes a virtue of offering succor to travelers, the rootless, and the persecuted. Immigration, the social-political system we’ve constructed around those ideas, plays a vital role in the narratives of many nations. … Continue reading

Women filing gender-based asylum claims long faced skepticism and outright rejection within the U.S. immigration system. Despite erratic progress, the United States still fails to recognize gender as an established category for experiencing persecution. Gender exists in a sort of … Continue reading