Cover for ALRIDGE: The Black Intellectual Tradition: African American Thought in the Twentieth Century. Click for larger image

The Black Intellectual Tradition

African American Thought in the Twentieth Century

Considering the development and ongoing influence of Black thought

From 1900 to the present, people of African descent living in the United States have drawn on homegrown and diasporic minds to create a Black intellectual tradition engaged with ideas on race, racial oppression, and the world. This volume presents essays on the diverse thought behind the fight for racial justice as developed by African American artists and intellectuals; performers and protest activists; institutions and organizations; and educators and religious leaders. By including both women’s and men’s perspectives from the U.S. and the Diaspora, the essays explore the full landscape of the Black intellectual tradition. Throughout, contributors engage with important ideas ranging from the consideration of gender within the tradition, to intellectual products generated outside the intelligentsia, to the ongoing relationship between thought and concrete effort in the quest for liberation.

Expansive in scope and interdisciplinary in practice, The Black Intellectual Tradition delves into the ideas that animated a people’s striving for full participation in American life.

Contributors: Derrick P. Alridge, Keisha N. Blain, Cornelius L. Bynum, Jeffrey Lamar Coleman, Pero Gaglo Dagbovie, Stephanie Y. Evans, Aaron David Gresson III, Claudrena N. Harold, Leonard Harris, Maurice J. Hobson, La TaSha B. Levy, Layli Maparyan, Zebulon V. Miletsky, R. Baxter Miller, Edward Onaci, Venetria K. Patton, James B. Stewart, and Nikki M. Taylor


Derrick P. Alridge is a professor of education in the School for Education and affiliate faculty in the Carter G. Woodson Institute for African American and African Studies at the University of Virginia. He is the author of The Educational Thought of W. E. B. DuBois: An Intellectual History. Cornelius Bynum is an associate professor of history at Purdue University and the author of A. Philip Randolph and the Struggle for Civil Rights. James B. Stewart is a professor emeritus of labor studies and employment relations and African American studies at Penn State University. His books include Flight in Search of Vision.

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