Cover for STALLINGS: Funk the Erotic: Transaesthetics and Black Sexual Cultures. Click for larger image
Ebook Information

Funk the Erotic

Transaesthetics and Black Sexual Cultures
Awards and Recognition:

• Emily Toth Award for Best Single Work by One or More Authors in Women's Studies, Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association (PCA/ACA), 2016
• Finalist, 28th Annual Lambda Literary Awards, LGBT Studies, 2016
• Alan Bray Memorial Book Award, GL/Q Caucus of the Modern Language Association, 2016

Freeing your mind so the funk can follow

Funk. It is multisensory and multidimensional philosophy used in conjunction with the erotic, eroticism, and black erotica. It is the affect that shapes film, performance, sound, food, technology, drugs, energy, time, and the seeds of revolutionary ideas for black movements. But funk is also an experience to feel, to hear, to touch and taste, and in Funk the Erotic, L. H. Stallings uses funk in all its iterations as an innovation in black studies.

Stallings uses funk to highlight the importance of the erotic and eroticism in Black cultural and political movements, debunking "the truth of sex" and its histories. Brandishing funk as a theoretical tool, Stallings argues that Western theories of the erotic fail as universally applicable terms or philosophies, and thus lack utility in discussions of black bodies, subjects, and culture. In considering the Victorian concept of freak in black funk, Stallings proposes that black artists across all media have fashioned a tradition that embraces the superfreak, sexual guerrilla, sexual magic, mama's porn, black trans narratives, and sex work in a post-human subject position. Their goal: to ensure survival and evolution in a world that exploits black bodies in capitalist endeavors, imperialism, and colonization.

Revitalizing and wide-ranging, Funk the Erotic offers a needed examination of black sexual cultures, a discursive evolution of black ideas about eroticism, a critique of work society, a reexamination of love, and an articulation of the body in black movements.


"Funk the Erotic opens a new avenue in black thought and feeling, one dis/oriented by the sensorium rather than the cerebrum."--Feminist Wire

"Funk the Erotic is a groundbreaking work in its scope, its methodological breadth, and the creativity and originality of the ideas in introduces into several discourses. In theorizing funk as a specifically erotic, bodily, and embodiable hermeneutic for understanding sexuality across mediums and genres, Stallings proposes exciting shifts in black feminist, performance studies, sexuality studies, and literary studies methodologies."--American Quarterly

"Where Toni Morrison theorized 'eruptions of funk' in African American literature, this book funks the erotic taking up trans politics, nineteenth-century freaks, funky beats, and other queerly sexed subjects that make up 'profane sites of memory.'"--Jennifer Brody, author of Punctuation: Art, Politics, and Play

"Funk the Erotic is a passionately delivered and urgently necessary analysis of black sexuality, literature, and popular culture. By reading the 'funky erotixxx' of black sexual cultures against the dominant trends in black studies, L. H. Stallings offers us an alternative archive of African American literature, one composed of forgotten novels, sex manuals, YouTube videos, adult magazines, and so much more. Funk the Erotic is a bold, brilliant, unapologetically superfreaky text."--Erica R. Edwards, author of Charisma and the Fictions of Black Leadership

Support for this research was received from the Institute for Advanced Study at Indiana University, a research Center for the Office of the Vice Provost for Research


L. H. Stallings is an associate professor of women’s studies at the University of Maryland-College Park

To order online:
//www.press.uillinois.edu/books/catalog/44aam5mk9780252039591.html

To order by phone:
(800) 621-2736 (USA/Canada)
(773) 702-7000 (International)

Related Titles

previous book next book
Black Sexual Economies - Cover
Black Sexual Economies

Race and Sex in a Culture of Capital

Edited by Adrienne D. Davis and the BSE Collective

Reimagining Liberation - Cover
Reimagining Liberation

How Black Women Transformed Citizenship in the French Empire

Annette K. Joseph-Gabriel

Pleasure in the News - Cover
Pleasure in the News

African American Readership and Sexuality in the Black Press

Kim Gallon

Black Music Research Journal - Cover
Black Music Research Journal

Edited by Gayle Murchison

Lost in the USA - Cover
Lost in the USA

American Identity from the Promise Keepers to the Million Mom March

Deborah Gray White

Ebony Magazine and Lerone Bennett Jr. - Cover
Ebony Magazine and Lerone Bennett Jr.

Popular Black History in Postwar America

E. James West

Women, Gender, and Families of Color - Cover
Women, Gender, and Families of Color

Edited by Jennifer F. Hamer

The Black Intellectual Tradition - Cover
The Black Intellectual Tradition

African American Thought in the Twentieth Century

Edited by Derrick P. Alridge, Cornelius L. Bynum, and James B. Stewart

Afro-Nostalgia - Cover
Afro-Nostalgia

Feeling Good in Contemporary Black Culture

Badia Ahad-Legardy

Autochthonomies - Cover
Autochthonomies

Transnationalism, Testimony, and Transmission in the African Diaspora

Myriam J. A. Chancy

Passing the Baton - Cover
Passing the Baton

Black Women Track Stars and American Identity

Cat M. Ariail

Surviving Southampton - Cover
Surviving Southampton

African American Women and Resistance in Nat Turner's Community

Vanessa M. Holden

James Baldwin and the 1980s - Cover
James Baldwin and the 1980s

Witnessing the Reagan Era

Joseph Vogel

Black Queer Freedom - Cover
Black Queer Freedom

Spaces of Injury and Paths of Desire

GerShun Avilez