Cover for COOPER: Once a Cigar Maker: Men, Women, and Work Culture in American Cigar Factories, 1900-1919. Click for larger image

Once a Cigar Maker

Men, Women, and Work Culture in American Cigar Factories, 1900-1919

Patricia A. Cooper charts the course of competition, conflict, and camaraderie among American cigar makers during the two decades that preceded mechanization of their work. In the process, she reconstructs the work culture, traditions, and daily lives of the male cigar makers who were members of the Cigar Makers' International Union of America (CMIU) and of the nonunion women who made cigars under a division of labor called the "team system." But Cooper not only examines the work lives of these men and women, she also analyzes their relationship to each other and to their employers during these critical years of the industry's transition from hand craft to mass production.

"In her admirably researched Once a Cigarmaker, Patricia Cooper weaves a fascinating tale about the three-way relationship that developed between new technology in the cigarmaking industry, and its impact on both the older generation of skilled, male cigarmakers, and on the unskilled immigrant women who replaced them as the major labor force in the trade after the First World War. . . . [This book pushes] back the boundaries of our knowledge at the interface between institutional labor history, cultural analysis, and the social history of work in a fresh and original way."--Reviews in American History

"Among the best studies we have to date of shop-floor work traditions for both men and women. It is a powerful analysis of work, gender, and the union movement that insightfully moves us beyond simplifications about craft union elitism and sexism."--Journal of Social History

"Subtle, incisive, and original, Once a Cigarmaker has broken new ground at the intersection of business, labor, and women's history."--Business History Review

"This fine study, spiced with humor rare in social history, provides a provocative argument and good reading."--Oral History Review

Patricia A. Cooper is an associate professor of history at Drexel University.

To order online:

To order by phone:
(800) 621-2736 (USA/Canada)
(773) 702-7000 (International)

Related Titles

previous book next book
Colored No More - Cover
Colored No More

Reinventing Black Womanhood in Washington, D.C.

Treva B. Lindsey

Mister Pulitzer and the Spider - Cover
Mister Pulitzer and the Spider

Modern News from Realism to the Digital

Kevin G. Barnhurst

Across the Waves - Cover
Across the Waves

How the United States and France Shaped the International Age of Radio

Derek W. Vaillant

Franklin D. Roosevelt - Cover
Franklin D. Roosevelt

Road to the New Deal, 1882-1939

Roger Daniels

Of G-Men and Eggheads - Cover
Of G-Men and Eggheads

The FBI and the New York Intellectuals

John Rodden

Frontiers of Labor - Cover
Frontiers of Labor

Comparative Histories of the United States and Australia

Edited by Greg Patmore and Shelton Stromquist

Creating the Big Ten - Cover
Creating the Big Ten

Courage, Corruption, and Commercialization

Winton U. Solberg

Pink-Slipped - Cover

What Happened to Women in the Silent Film Industries?

Jane M. Gaines

Discriminating Sex - Cover
Discriminating Sex

White Leisure and the Making of the American "Oriental"

Amy Sueyoshi

Lost in the USA - Cover
Lost in the USA

American Identity from the Promise Keepers to the Million Mom March

Deborah Gray White

Ladies of the Ticker - Cover
Ladies of the Ticker

Women and Wall Street from the Gilded Age to the Great Depression

George Robb

Rape in Chicago - Cover
Rape in Chicago

Race, Myth, and the Courts

Dawn Rae Flood

Leaders of Their Race - Cover
Leaders of Their Race

Educating Black and White Women in the New South

Sarah H. Case

Black Public History in Chicago - Cover
Black Public History in Chicago

Civil Rights Activism from World War II into the Cold War

Ian Rocksborough-Smith

Pigskin Nation - Cover
Pigskin Nation

How the NFL Remade American Politics

Jesse Berrett

Women against Abortion - Cover
Women against Abortion

Inside the Largest Moral Reform Movement of the Twentieth Century

Karissa Haugeberg