Cover for GILL: Beauty Shop Politics: African American Women's Activism in the Beauty Industry. Click for larger image
Ebook Information

Beauty Shop Politics

African American Women's Activism in the Beauty Industry
Awards and Recognition:

Winner of the 2010 Letitia Woods Brown Memorial Book Award.

A bold reassessment of black beauty salons as vital sites for social change

Looking through the lens of black business history, Beauty Shop Politics shows how black beauticians in the Jim Crow era parlayed their economic independence and access to a public community space into platforms for activism. Tiffany M. Gill argues that the beauty industry played a crucial role in the creation of the modern black female identity and that the seemingly frivolous space of a beauty salon actually has stimulated social, political, and economic change.

From the founding of the National Negro Business League in 1900 and onward, African Americans have embraced the entrepreneurial spirit by starting their own businesses, but black women's forays into the business world were overshadowed by those of black men. With a broad scope that encompasses the role of gossip in salons, ethnic beauty products, and the social meanings of African American hair textures, Gill shows how African American beauty entrepreneurs built and sustained a vibrant culture of activism in beauty salons and schools. Enhanced by lucid portrayals of black beauticians and drawing on archival research and oral histories, Beauty Shop Politics conveys the everyday operations and rich culture of black beauty salons as well as their role in building community.


"The scope of the material and interdisciplinary scholarship evident throughout the book makes Beauty Shop Politics a comprehensive addition to the bookshelves of women's studies, African-American studies, and entrepreneurial studies, as well as to history, business, and political-science departments. It is a truly interdisciplinary endeavor."--The Chronicle of Higher Education

"[Gill] impressively demonstrates how beauticians became an important part of the black economic urban infrastructure. . . . Highly recommended. "--Choice

"A welcome relocation of the discussion of black women's beauty culture."--Women's Review of Books

"A meticulously researched, well-written, and cogently argued book that contributes to scholarship that complicates historiographical boundaries between business history, labor history, history of consumer culture, women's history, and the history of African American political activism."--The Journal of American History

"Gill has made a major contribution to our understanding that the beauty industry has been central to African American women's search for economic sufficiency and the struggle for all African Americans' political rights."--American Studies

"Gill's book is important. . . . Beauty Shop Politics ... allows a glimpse into black women's relationships with each other, relationships that are simultaneously professional and intimate, in which black women are both producers and consumers, as well as active creators, on both sides, of spaces that are uniquely their own."--The Journal of Southern History

"A tremendous contribution to African American history. Beauty Shop Politics demonstrates the central role of black women in the history of black business and shows how black businesswomen challenged the dictates of black male leaders in the worlds of black business and civil rights."--Lynn Hudson, author of The Making of "Mammy Pleasant": A Black Entrepreneur in Nineteenth-Century San Francisco


Tiffany M. Gill is an associate professor of Black Studies and history at the University of Delaware.

To order online:
//www.press.uillinois.edu/books/catalog/86hdc8fp9780252035050.html

To order by phone:
(800) 621-2736 (USA/Canada)
(773) 702-7000 (International)

Related Titles

previous book next book
The Merchant Prince of Black Chicago - Cover
The Merchant Prince of Black Chicago

Anthony Overton and the Building of a Financial Empire

Robert E. Weems Jr.

Roots of the Black Chicago Renaissance - Cover
Roots of the Black Chicago Renaissance

New Negro Writers, Artists, and Intellectuals, 1893-1930

Edited by Richard A. Courage and Christopher Robert Reed

All Our Trials - Cover
All Our Trials

Prisons, Policing, and the Feminist Fight to End Violence

Emily L. Thuma

Pleasure in the News - Cover
Pleasure in the News

African American Readership and Sexuality in the Black Press

Kim Gallon

Hostile Heartland - Cover
Hostile Heartland

Racism, Repression, and Resistance in the Midwest

Brent M. S. Campney

Degrees of Difference - Cover
Degrees of Difference

Reflections of Women of Color on Graduate School

Edited by Kimberly D. McKee and Denise A. Delgado

Reimagining Liberation - Cover
Reimagining Liberation

How Black Women Transformed Citizenship in the French Empire

Annette K. Joseph-Gabriel

Josephine Baker and Katherine Dunham - Cover
Josephine Baker and Katherine Dunham

Dances in Literature and Cinema

Hannah Durkin

Women, Gender, and Families of Color - Cover
Women, Gender, and Families of Color

Edited by Jennifer F. Hamer

Between Fitness and Death - Cover
Between Fitness and Death

Disability and Slavery in the Caribbean

Stefanie Hunt-Kennedy

African Art Reframed - Cover
African Art Reframed

Reflections and Dialogues on Museum Culture

Bennetta Jules-Rosette and J.R. Osborn

Black Music Research Journal - Cover
Black Music Research Journal

Edited by Gayle Murchison

To Turn the Whole World Over - Cover
To Turn the Whole World Over

Black Women and Internationalism

Edited by Keisha N. Blain and Tiffany M. Gill

Building Womanist Coalitions - Cover
Building Womanist Coalitions

Writing and Teaching in the Spirit of Love

Edited by Gary L. Lemons

Ebony Magazine and Lerone Bennett Jr. - Cover
Ebony Magazine and Lerone Bennett Jr.

Popular Black History in Postwar America

E. James West