Tag Archives: architecture

Reverent. Classical. (Well, neoclassical.) Uncontroversial in design, though the subject has a few fringe detractors. The Lincoln Memorial began to take shape in 1915. By then, architects and others had pitched a number of, shall we say, novel ideas about … Continue reading

On October 7, 2004, the National Register of Historic Places added the Farnsworth House, located near Plano, to its list of significant locales. Beautiful, yet a challenge to human habitation, the Farnsworth House won immediate plaudits when Ludwig Mies van der … Continue reading

Well, less than 100 years after women won the right to vote, one of them is running for the White as the nominee of a major political party. Tonight, Hillary Clinton will accept the nomination for one of the world’s most … Continue reading

You night think a skyline would maintain a certain consistency, an unchanging nature that reflected the fact that building a skyscraper is one of humanity’s more complex undertakings. Yet recent newsicles tell us that the most storied skyline of all, Chicago’s, … Continue reading

Once rare wonders of the world targeted by giant apes, skyscrapers have become an indelible aspect of the urban experience. Their majesty inspires local pride, their beauty elicits amazement, and their daring/obnoxious designs spark debate. No city is more identified … Continue reading

Field Building, 135 S. La Salle Street.  Graham, Anderson, Probst, and White, 1934.  View from southeast.  (Contemporary post card, collection of the author) Announced on September 29, 1929 just days before the stock market crash, the Field Building was to … Continue reading

Conway Building, corner of Clark and Washington Streets.  D. H. Burnham & Co., 1913.  View from northeast.  (Contemporary post card, collection of the author) Four large neoclassical office blocks designed by Burnham’s office around the time of his death in … Continue reading

  Chicago Stock Exchange, view from northeast.  (Contemporary post card, collection of the author) The Stock Exchange, a project to fund a new trading room through the provision of office space for traders and associated businesses, alternated bay windows with … Continue reading

Rookery Building.  View from northwest (contemporary post card, collection of the author). The Rookery became Chicago’s center of architectural, contracting, engineering, and subcontracting expertise. It was intended to be the most luxurious commercial structure in Chicago and its size along … Continue reading

Masonic Temple, corner of Randolph and State Streets.  Burnham and Root, 1892 (demolished, 1939).  (120 Photographic View of Chicago, Rand McNally, 1912) Buildings braced by sway-rods typically had two or mote dedicated vertical planes on which, at every level, rods … Continue reading