Tag Archives: civil rights

On this day in 1947, the City of New Orleans made its first run between the Chicago and the Crescent City on the Illinois Central line. The City traveled the early 921-mile route in the daytime in those days. The Panama Limited was … Continue reading

Well, less than 100 years after women won the right to vote, one of them is running for the White as the nominee of a major political party. Tonight, Hillary Clinton will accept the nomination for one of the world’s most … Continue reading

A boxing legend but a towering American cultural figure, Muhammad Ali lived a life beyond adjectives, indeed beyond superlatives, and that’s just what he set out to do. Tributes to the Greatest have filled the Internet since we heard word … Continue reading

On Monday, April 25, The College at Brockport, State University of New York, honored alum Fannie Barrier Williams, its first African American female graduate. The institution dedicated a plaque to Williams, honoring in particular her civil rights work. The subject … Continue reading

Civil Rights in the Texas Borderlands: Dr. Lawrence A. Nixon & Black Activism by Will Guzmán has been honored with the C. Calvin Smith Award presented by the Southern Conference on African American Studies, Inc. (SCASSI) The C. Calvin Smith Book Award recognizes … Continue reading

David Lucander, author Winning the War for Democracy: The March on Washington Movement, 1941-1946, was recognized by the African American Historical Society of Rockland County (NY) with this year’s Griot Award. The award is given “for outstanding contributions in transmitting … Continue reading

This day in 1925, activist A. Philip Randolph led the organization of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, a campaign Randolph declared nothing less than “a significant landmark in the history and struggle of the Negro workers in America.” For … Continue reading

As Google has reminded many of you, today marks the birthday of civil rights pioneer, suffragette, anti-lynching activist, and sociologist Ida B. Wells. This remarkable woman participated in many crusades in the Progressive Era of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. … Continue reading

On January 6, 1955 contralto Marian Anderson became the first African American soloist to sing at New York’s Metropolitan Opera. She appeared in the role of Ulrica (a Creole fortuneteller medium) in Verdi’s Un Ballo in Maschera. Born in 1897, Anderson’s parents moved to … Continue reading

David Lucander is a professor of history at SUNY Rockland Community College. He recently answered some questions about his UIP book Winning the War for Democracy: The March on Washington Movement, 1941-1946. Q: What was the March on Washington Movement (MOWM)? … Continue reading