Tag Archives: Illinois history

On June 5, 1942, the Herald-News in Joliet reported on one of the deadliest industrial accidents in state history: the explosion at the Elwood Ordnance Plant. At 2:41 a.m., an explosion took place in a loading line at a plant Building … Continue reading

On May 4, 1927, balloonist Hawthorne C. Gray, a captain in the Army Air Corps, reached new heights in human endeavor. Literally. Taking off from Scott Field near Belleville, Gray ascended to 42,270 feet in a silk, rubberized, aluminum-coated balloon. … Continue reading

The President does not know the truth. He, like me, has been imposed upon. He does not know that you made my young chiefs drunk and got their consent and pretended to get mine. He would not drive me from … Continue reading

Ninety-eight years ago, the founders of the University of Illinois Press considered its mission. Academics will disagree, of course. Debates raged. Memos were strongly worded. But it all worked out in the end. The founders thankfully put aside any temptation to … Continue reading

In the new UIP release The Dumville Letters, Anne M. Heinz and John P. Heinz bring us the antebellum-era correspondence of Ann Dumville and her daughters Hepzibah, Jemima, and Elizabeth, as well as their acquaintances. Kept at the Lincoln Presidential Library in Springfield, the Dumville … Continue reading

Today marks the 196th anniversary of Illinois becoming a part of the United States. Not yet the Land of Lincoln—the Railsplitter had just turned nine the previous winter—Illinois forever left behind its status as part of the Northwest Territory. State … Continue reading

Picturing Illinois authors John Jakle and Keith Sculle appeared on WTTW’s “Chicago Tonight” program on February 21st. “Chicago Tonight” also posted a gallery of some of the postcard art featured in Picturing Illinois.