Tag Archives: Throwbacklist Thursday

Pretty much every world religion and ethical system makes a virtue of offering succor to travelers, the rootless, and the persecuted. Immigration, the social-political system we’ve constructed around those ideas, plays a vital role in the narratives of many nations. … Continue reading

Though UIP published photography on the beauty of the Midwest and the University of Illinois campus, we also venture out of these expected subjected areas. This week we present a few books that venture into landscapes of industry and humanity … Continue reading

It’s been awhile since I could legitimately sing, “Give me a head with hair/long, beautiful hair.” But the Cowsills, via America’s tribal love-rock musical, expressed the importance of the streamin’, flaxen, waxin’ locks with winning pop harmonies and frequent radio airplay. … Continue reading

Whenever the Olympic Games convene, we remember that the United States shares the planet with other countries. We also remember that many of the world’s people play team handball. At the University of Illinois Press, our authors journey by jet, balloon, donkey, clipper ship, … Continue reading

Whether you consider the Olympic Games a triumph of human endeavor and achievement, or an appalling cesspool of corruption and drug experimentation, it is that rare mega-event that always grabs the world’s attention. The University of Illinois Press maintains a longstanding dedication to … Continue reading

With robots and other thinking devices prepared to replace us in about eight days, we thought it time to curry favor by highlighting UIP titles that engage the dilemmas and delights of our information age. Cyber-Marx: Cycles and Circuits of … Continue reading

Generally considered a bummer of epic proportions, the Great Depression nonetheless inspired a measure of nostalgia. Americans looked back to a simpler time, of lives unencumbered by food, employment, homes, or arable Great Plains farmland. Liberals celebrated the halcyon days … Continue reading

I wouldn’t try being a mom for a million bucks. I’m not just talking about all the surgery it would require. Fatherhood is definitely its own cross to bear, don’t get me wrong. There’s a reason men die at a … Continue reading

Drink bothered the Founding Fathers. Not on a personal level, of course. John Adams drank a tankard of hard cider with his breakfast and George Washington went on many a bender. No, they saw boozing as a threat to the good functioning of … Continue reading

Which came first, the cave painting or the story behind the images? Even anthropologists wonder. Storytelling is at least a contender for Second Human Art, cooking being the agreed-upon first, not that inadequately-cooked mammoth stuffed with termites would make the cover of Everyday … Continue reading