Tag Archives: women’s history

Emerging in the 1850s, elocutionists recited poetry or drama with music to create a new type of performance. The genre—dominated by women—achieved remarkable popularity. Yet the elocutionists and their art fell into total obscurity during the twentieth century. Today we … Continue reading

Today the Google Doodle swings to celebrating the birthday of Alice Paul. Born into a close-knit Quaker community, Paul inherited the passion of forebears who fought for abolition. In her case, the cause was women’s suffrage, and Paul took it … Continue reading

The Women’s World Cup reached its conclusion over the weekend. The U.S. team rained early goals on Japan and emerged with a 5-2 victory to win its first Cup since the triumph of the now-iconic 1999 team. Perhaps as noteworthy was the … Continue reading

In observance of International Nurses Day, an excerpt from Nursing Civil Rights: Gender and Race in the Army Nurse Corps, by Clarissa J. Threat. Before 1941 African Americans did not ignore the military’s call for nurses. Hoping to participate, black nurses … Continue reading