Author Deposit Permissions Policy

Journal of American Folklore

In response to the evolving nature of scholarly exchange and communications, the American Folklore Society has established the following policy regarding authors’ deposit of their Journal of American Folklore (JAF) contributions (including articles, reviews, notes, etc.) in their institutional repositories. This policy replaces any previous AFS author deposit policy, so it also applies to materials already published in the JAF.

Definitions

[These definitions are based on those on the SHERPA/RoMEO web site (www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeoinfo.html).]

This policy applies to pre-prints, post-prints, and the publisher’s version

A pre-print is a work-in-process: a contribution not yet accepted, or perhaps even submitted, to the JAF, that you make available for comments and criticism from others. 

A post-print is the version of your JAF contribution after peer review and acceptance for the Journal of American Folklore, with revisions having been made.

The publisher’s version is the PDF file of your contribution as it appears in the Journal of American Folklore.

Policy

AFS encourages authors to post pre-prints and post-prints of their JAF contributions in temporary locations, such as personal websites, until such time as the publisher’s version is available. 

Authors may post publisher’s versions of their JAF contributions to the repository of their home institution as soon as those versions are available. When posting a publisher’s version, authors must include one of the following two notations:

For JAF contributions published before 2003:

Published as [provide the complete bibliographic citation as it appears in the print version of the Journal of American Folklore]. © [Year] by the American Folklore Society.

For JAF contributions published beginning in 2003:

Published as [provide the complete bibliographic citation as it appears in the print version of the Journal of American Folklore]. © [Year] by the Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois.

 

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