New Books

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Goodbye iSlave

A Manifesto for Digital Abolition

Jack Linchuan Qiu

Connexions

Histories of Race and Sex in North America

Edited by Jennifer Brier, Jim Downs, and Jennifer L. Morgan

Bill Clifton

America's Bluegrass Ambassador to the World

Bill C. Malone

Gendered Asylum

Race and Violence in U.S. Law and Politics

Sara L. McKinnon

Dissident Friendships

Feminism, Imperialism, and Transnational Solidarity

Edited by Elora Halim Chowdhury and Liz Philipose

Claiming Neighborhood

New Ways of Understanding Urban Change

John J. Betancur and Janet L. Smith

Remaking the Urban Social Contract

Health, Energy, and the Environment

Edited by Michael A. Pagano

A Latin American Music Reader

Views from the South

Edited by Javier F. León and Helena Simonett

Baring Witness

36 Mormon Women Talk Candidly about Love, Sex, and Marriage

Edited by Holly Welker

Sex Testing

Gender Policing in Women's Sports

Lindsay Parks Pieper

The Rise and Fall of Olympic Amateurism

Matthew P. Llewellyn and John Gleaves

Cold War Games

Propaganda, the Olympics, and U.S. Foreign Policy

Toby C. Rider

Media in New Turkey

The Origins of an Authoritarian Neoliberal State

Bilge Yesil

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Release Party: A Century of Transnationalism Immigrant transnationalism reminded scholars that migrants, in leaving home for a new life abroad, inevitably tie place of origin and destination together, scholars of transnationalism have also insisted that today’s cross-border connections are unprecedented. This collection of articles by sociologically … Continue reading

200 Years of Illinois: Lead Is Galena and Galena Is Lead On September 30, 1822, the federal government gave the first lease to mine lead in the Galena region to Richard M. Johnson. They also provided armed soldiers as guards to dissuade the local Fox people from disputing Johnson’s claim. Johnson, … Continue reading

Banning books Last year Slate ran an article that, in that annoying Slate way, made it clear: the battle is won. We no longer have to fear book banning. It is a rare phenomenon, in America, at least, and true bannings—as opposed to, say, a … Continue reading

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