Category Archives: american history

Author Michael Hicks will be signing copies of his book The Mormon Tabernacle Choir:  A Biography at BookExpo America on Thursday, May 28 at 11am EDT. BookExpo America (BEA) is North America’s largest gathering of book trade professionals attracting an … Continue reading

For the tenth consecutive year, the University of Illinois Press will have a large presence at the Chicago Tribune Printers Row Lit Fest.  Festival goers can visit the University of Illinois Press tent on Dearborn Street, between Congress and Polk. … Continue reading

In observance of International Nurses Day, an excerpt from Nursing Civil Rights: Gender and Race in the Army Nurse Corps, by Clarissa J. Threat. Before 1941 African Americans did not ignore the military’s call for nurses. Hoping to participate, black nurses … Continue reading

Chicago is a city of bridges. Second only to Amsterdam in the number of drawbridges, the city is connected–and in some cased divided–by the engineering that channels foot, wheeled and marine traffic across the waterways. Patrick McBriarty, author of Chicago … Continue reading

Jesse Jackson Jr. gained his Congressional seat by winning a special election to replace Rep. Mel Reynolds. Reynolds resigned after being convicted of sexual misconduct. Jackson himself resigned as the Representative of the Second Congressional District of Illinois facing charges … Continue reading

Baseball on Trial by Nathaniel Grow is co-winner of the 2015 Larry Ritter Book Award from the Society of American Baseball Research. The award recognizes the best new baseball book primarily set in the Deadball Era (1901-1919) published during the … Continue reading

Digital Depression author Dan Schiller is a professor in the Graduate School of Library and Information Science and the Department of Communication at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. In light of the recent FCC ruling on net neutrality, Schiller weighs … Continue reading

When aviation pioneer Octave Chanute died in 1910, no one could have dreamed that man would not only conquer the air, but venture into outer space. Five years after Chanute’s death the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, or NACA, was … Continue reading

Laurent Pernot is the executive vice chancellor of the City Colleges of Chicago. Pernot came to the U.S. as a Chicago-area foreign-exchange student in 1988 and caught ’89 Cubs playoff fever. He answered some questions about his book Before the Ivy: The … Continue reading

We have entered that mid-February time when catchers and pitchers report to spring training to prepare for the baseball season. To don the tools of ignorance. To pretend to run wind sprints in the outfield. To cadge a couple of … Continue reading