Category Archives: american history

Sensing Chicago: Noisemakers, Strikebreakers, and Muckrakers by Adam Mack has been given an award for Superior Achievement by the Illinois State Historical Society. The awards committee noted, “This scholarly book offers a fresh look at the dynamics between the working … Continue reading

For a boring sport, baseball sure produces a lot of interesting writing. Maybe because writers have a lot of time to think, take notes, nap, and so on waiting for something to happen during a game. And then when something … Continue reading

“My family is American, and has been for generations, in all its branches, direct and collateral.” April 27 marks the 194th anniversary of the birth of Ulysses S. Grant, victor of the Civil War and somewhat unsuccessful president of the … Continue reading

What does America need? You probably have a long list. It might even include “a good five-cent cigar.” What does America NOT need? More corn. We’re swimming in corn. South America is swimming in corn. If there was an East America, its … Continue reading

The Organization of American Historians Annual Meeting in Providence, Rhode Island, April 7-10, 2016 was a great opportunity for editors and staff from the Press to congregate with people in the field of history (and perhaps check into future acquisitions … Continue reading

Struggle for the Soul of the Postwar South: White Evangelical Protestants and Operation Dixie by Elizabeth Fones-Wolf and Ken Fones-Wolf has won the David Montgomery Award from the Organization of American Historians (OAH) for the best book on a topic … Continue reading

If you are headed to the Organization of American Historians Annual Meeting in Providence, Rhode Island during April 7-9 there are a few things you’ll want to be on the lookout for courtesy of your friends at UIP. 1) Given … Continue reading

Ann Dumville and her daughters Jemima, Hephzibah, and Elizabeth were not history makers in the way we traditionally think of such figures. None of these women held high political office nor stood firsthand as a participant in a pivotal moment … Continue reading

Though another state calls itself the Crossroads of America, Illinois deserves the title as much as any of the Lower 48, for here the prairie gathers the railroads and interstates to itself before the American transportation flares out onto the Plains … Continue reading

Guenter B. Risse is a professor emeritus of the history of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. He answered some questions about his book Driven by Fear: Epidemics and Isolation in San Francisco’s House of Pestilence. Q: What was the … Continue reading