Category Archives: american history

Laurent Pernot is the executive vice chancellor of the City Colleges of Chicago. Pernot came to the U.S. as a Chicago-area foreign-exchange student in 1988 and caught ’89 Cubs playoff fever. He answered some questions about his book Before the Ivy: The … Continue reading

We have entered that mid-February time when catchers and pitchers report to spring training to prepare for the baseball season. To don the tools of ignorance. To pretend to run wind sprints in the outfield. To cadge a couple of … Continue reading

For the month of February 2015, to coincide with Black History Month, we have lowered the e-book list price of four titles in the University of Illinois Press catalog to $2.99. Free Black Communities and the Underground Railroad: The Geography … Continue reading

In 1970, the big three television networks of ABC, CBS and NBC took notice of the feminist movement. The stories on TV news ranged from a patronizing dismissal of feminists to balanced reports on child care needs and employment discrimination. “Television … Continue reading

Thomas I. Faith is a historian at the U.S. Department of State. He answered some questions about his book Behind the Gas Mask: The U.S. Chemical Warfare Service in War and Peace. Q: When was poison gas first utilized as method … Continue reading

Initially published soon after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., David Levering Lewis’s King: A Biography was acclaimed by historians as a foundational work on the life of the civil rights icon. In 2013 the University of Illinois Press published an … Continue reading

On this date in 1967, an American institution—nay, the most sacred of secular holidays—was born. Super Bowl I pitted the Kansas City Chiefs, a team reared on red meat and jazz, against a Green Bay Packers franchise shaped by fried cheese curds … Continue reading

Louis Corsino is a professor of sociology at North Central College. He recently answered some questions about his book The Neighborhood Outfit: Organized Crime in Chicago Heights. Q: Who were the “Chicago Heights boys” and what was their role in the … Continue reading

Two UIP titles are available in paperback editions today. Charles Ives in the Mirror: American Histories of an Iconic Composer Charles Ives was a virtual unknown in his lifetime. But in the 60 years since the composer’s death he has … Continue reading

American troops first faced poison gas on February 2, 1918. German artillery units used the cover of a heavy afternoon fog to lob shells filled with phosgene and diphosgene on men serving in the 1st Division of the American Expeditionary … Continue reading