Category Archives: american history

On May 17, 1954 the United States Supreme Court handed down a ruling that “separate educational facilities are inherently unequal.” This was the landmark ruling on Brown v. Board of Education which changed struck a major blow against practices of … Continue reading

Chasing Newsroom Diversity: From Jim Crow to Affirmative Action by Gwyneth Mellinger is the winner of the Frank Luther Mott / Kappa Tau Alpha Research Award for the best research-based book on journalism and mass communication published in 2013. The … Continue reading

Chicago’s double-deck Michigan Avenue bridge turned 94 years old this week. The bridge is one of the most revered and celebrated landmarks in the Second City. When the movable bridge was put into operation in 1920 there was much fanfare. … Continue reading

On May 4, 1886, someone threw a bomb in Chicago’s Haymarket Square. Timothy Messer-Kruse, author of The Haymarket Conspiracy: Transatlantic Anarchist Networks, and Leon Fink, editor of the recently released Workers in Hard Times both recently appeared on Chicago’s WBEZ radio to discuss … Continue reading

Donald G. Godfrey is a broadcast educator, professional broadcaster, and historian. Godfrey is also a past president of the national Broadcast Education Association (BEA), a former editor of the Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media, and served as president of the … Continue reading

On Friday, March 14, 2014, Koritha Mitchell, author of  Living with Lynching:  African American Lynching Plays, Performance, and Citizenship, 1890-1930, spoke at the James Madison Memorial Building of the Library of Congress. At the event Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee presented the author with a … Continue reading

Nathaniel Grow is an assistant professor of legal studies at the University of Georgia’s Terry College of Business. He answered some questions about his new book Baseball on Trial: The Origin of Baseball’s Antitrust Exemption. Q: Why do you think so many … Continue reading

Anna Howard Shaw was a suffrage leader, an ordained minister, a physician and “an outrageous woman for her generation.” Trisha Franzen, a professor of women’s and gender studies at Albion College and the author Anna Howard Shaw: The Work of Woman … Continue reading

Cheryl Janifer LaRoche is a lecturer in American studies at the University of Maryland. She answered some questions about her book Free Black Communities and the Underground Railroad: The Geography of Resistance. Q: You write that the Underground Railroad is a … Continue reading

Alex Goodall is a lecturer in modern history at the University of York, where he specializes in the history of revolutionary and counterrevolutionary politics in the Americas. He answered some questions about his new book Loyalty and Liberty: American Countersubversion from World … Continue reading