Category Archives: american history

This day in 1925, activist A. Philip Randolph led the organization of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, a campaign Randolph declared nothing less than “a significant landmark in the history and struggle of the Negro workers in America.” For … Continue reading

In the 1800s, crowds flocked to watch balloon ascensions for many of the same reasons they go to stock car races. You got to see an odd vehicle do amazing things, and there was always a fair chance of witnessing … Continue reading

The morning dispatches bring the unwelcome news that chemical weapons may have been deployed this week in the Mideast, a reminder that the weapons, though long held considered beyond the pale, remain a threat. And, truth to tell, it was not long … Continue reading

Dirty Words: The Rhetoric of Public Sex Education, 1870-1924 by Robin E. Jensen has been awarded the 2015 NCA Health Communication Distinguished Book Award. In the book, Jensen details the approaches and outcomes of sex-education initiatives in the Progressive Era. The … Continue reading

Ethelene Whitmire has received  the 2015 Wheatley Book Award for First Nonfiction for her book Regina Anderson Andrews, Harlem Renaissance Librarian. The Wheatly Awards are presented by QBR: The Black Book Review and the Harlem Book Fair and were awarded at a reception in New … Continue reading

A federal appeals court has overturned some of former Governor Rod Blagojevich’s convictions On Tuesday, July 21st, the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals threw out convictions on five of Blagojevich’s 18 counts of corruption charges. Many of these charges related … Continue reading

As Google has reminded many of you, today marks the birthday of civil rights pioneer, suffragette, anti-lynching activist, and sociologist Ida B. Wells. This remarkable woman participated in many crusades in the Progressive Era of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. … Continue reading

Daisy Turner was a woman of many words. The storyteller and poet was a living repository of history. She related the stories of her own family, from the abduction of her ancestors in West Africa to her own upbringing in … Continue reading

It’s Friday, so it must (again) be time for the Illinois Congressional indictment story of the week. The news of June 26, 2015 brings a familiar face back into the ignominious circle of Illinois politicians under either investigation or indictment. Federal … Continue reading

Adam Mack is assistant professor of History in the Department of Liberal Arts at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. He recently answers some questions about his Studies in Sensory History series book Sensing Chicago: Noisemakers, Strikebreakers, and Muckrakers. … Continue reading