Category Archives: american history

Forty-four years ago today, national feminist groups staged the Women’s Strike for Equality. “If the success of media activism is measured by the amount of news coverage generated, the Strike for Equality hit the mother lode,” Bonnie J. Dow reports … Continue reading

Today, the enlightened everywhere celebrate Women’s Equality Day, commemorating not only the Nineteenth Amendment giving half of American humanity the right to vote outside of Wyoming, but recognizing all of the advances made by women—while noting what work remains to … Continue reading

Groundbreaking athlete Althea Gibson was born on August 25, 1927. A member of the International Tennis Hall of Fame, Althea Gibson won 11 Grand Slam tournaments. She was also the first black athlete to break the color barrier in international … Continue reading

On August 21, 1858 upstart challenger Abraham Lincoln entered into the first of seven debates with incumbent Senator Stephen Douglas in Ottawa, Illinois. Lincoln was challenging Douglas to represent Illinois in the U.S. Senate. The now-famous Lincoln-Douglas debates didn’t propel … Continue reading

Cheryl Janifer LaRoche‘s book, Free Black Communities and the Underground Railroad, examines the “geography of resistance” and tells the powerful and inspiring story of African Americans ensuring their own liberation in the midst of oppression. LaRoche shows how landscape features, … Continue reading

Simine Short is an aviation historian who has researched and written extensively on the history of motorless flight. Her first book, Glider Mail: An Aerophilatelic Handbook, received numerous research awards worldwide and is considered a standard reference by aerophilatelists and aviation researchers. She … Continue reading

Three UIP titles are available in paperback editions today. Locomotive to Aeromotive: Octave Chanute and the Transportation Revolution Earth, water, air—Octave Chanute grappled with the very elements themselves. He built the massive Chicago and Kansas City stockyards, bridged the so-called unbridgeable Missouri … Continue reading

Social activist and influential executive secretary of the National Urban League Eugene Kinckle Jones was born on July 30, 1885. Felix L. Armfield‘s biography Eugene Kinckle Jones: The National Urban League and Black Social Work, 1910-1940 details the life an impact … Continue reading

Darlene Clark Hine, co-editor of The New Black Studies Series, has been awarded with the 2013 National Humanities Medal. President Barack Obama presented the award to Hine at the White House on Monday, July 28. She is one of 10 … Continue reading

On May 17, 1954 the United States Supreme Court handed down a ruling that “separate educational facilities are inherently unequal.” This was the landmark ruling on Brown v. Board of Education which changed struck a major blow against practices of … Continue reading