Category Archives: american history

Author of Madam C.J. Walker’s Gospel of Giving: Black Women’s Philanthropy During Jim Crow, Tyrone McKinley Freeman, answers questions about his inspirations, motivations and what he wants readers to know about his book. Q: Why did you decide to write … Continue reading

Author, Sara E. Lampert, of Starring Women: Celebrity, Patriarchy, and American Theater, 1790-1850 answers questions about her purpose for writing, book influences, and discoveries about entertainers for her book. Q: Why did you decide to write this book? I have … Continue reading

Welcome to the 2020 University of Illinois Press American Anthropological Association virtual exhibit! While we wish this could be an in-person event, we’re still excited to show you new research in anthropology and ethnomusicology. Enjoy books, journal articles, author interviews, … Continue reading

Lydia R. Hamessley, author of Unlikely Angel: The Songs of Dolly Parton, answers questions about her inspirations, Appalachian music, songwriting, and, of course, music legend Dolly Parton. Q: Why did you decide to write this book? Laurie Matheson, the Director … Continue reading

Author, Lynn M. Hudson, of West Jim Crow: The Fight Against California’s Color Line answers questions about her influences, discoveries and purpose for writing. Q: Why did you decide to write this book? In the process of writing my first … Continue reading

Donald W. Rogers, author of Workers against the City, answers questions about the labor movement, American history, free speech, CIO v. Hague, and civil liberties. Q: Why did you decide to write this book? Free speech and assembly law are … Continue reading

Author of Upon the Altar of Work: Child Labor and the Rise of a New American Sectionalism, Betsy Wood answers questions about her influences, discoveries, and motivations for writing her new book. Q: Why did you decide to write this … Continue reading

Author, Richard C. Crepeau, of NFL Football: A History of America’s New National Pastime , NFL Centennial Edition answers questions about his inspirations, discoveries and dispels myths about sports. You can read his Q&A for the first edition here. Q: … Continue reading

Marian Wilson Kimber’s book The Elocutionists reclaimed a forgotten performance genre. From the mid-1800s to the 1940s, elocutionists recited poetry or drama with music to entertain audiences, in particular women’s groups. Women, in fact, dominated the art, and their purveyance … Continue reading

African American figures and subjects continue to play a central role in the stories and scholarship offered by the Press. A number of recent releases highlight our commitment to publishing books on the African American experience in Chicago. Always the … Continue reading