Elizabeth A. Clendinning Q&A

Elizabeth A. Clendinning, author of American Gamelan and the Ethnomusicological Imagination, answers questions about the intricacies of global ensembles, gaps between classroom discussions and real-life applications, and the cohesion of tradition and modernity.

Q: Why did you decide to write this book?

For decades, American colleges and universities have offered “world music” ensembles as an experiential way to diversify curricular offerings that otherwise are generally focused on Western classical music. The ensembles offer powerful ways to connect students to cultural and artistic communities across the world. Yet, many ensembles remain marginalized within their institutions and their instructors, especially expert foreign master musicians, are systematically under-resourced. I wanted readers to recognize all the individual work and sacrifice that goes into creating global ensemble communities as well as think about new ways to build intercultural and international artistic partnerships.

Q: Who were your biggest influences?

I am continually inspired and humbled by the generosity of my teachers—in particular, the Balinese and Balinese-American teachers and performing artists who devote much of their lives to introducing non-Balinese people to their art and culture. Though each person approaches teaching differently, the simultaneous rigor and humor that I see in their work is a constant inspiration.

Q: What is the most interesting discovery you made while researching and writing your book?

I feel like there is often a disconnect between how students are taught about how people from other cultural backgrounds experience the world and about how they are encouraged to process their own new cultural experiences. In contrast, these are inseparable processes. It is also important to remember that cross-cultural encounter is a two-way street.

Q: What myths do you hope your book will dispel or what do you hope your book will help readers unlearn?

Many people still view tradition and modernity as being opposites, especially when they encounter cultures that are foreign or exotic to them (how many Westerners perceive Balinese culture). This can also lead to judgements about what is culturally and artistically authentic or inauthentic. But as I found in working with musicians, teachers, and composers for this book, it’s much more interesting and fruitful to view tradition as a set of long-held principles that constantly inform present action.  

Elizabeth A. Clendinning Q&A
Elizabeth A. Clendinning is an associate professor of music at Wake Forest University.

American ethnomusicologists have long debated how to give their students access to a more diverse set of ensemble experiences without being exploitative or tokenistic. In the case of Bali, the island-wide economic reliance on foreign tourism has meant that Balinese professionals, musicians included, have been considering the issue of cultural representation for decades. It is time to recognize their agency and to find new ways, together, to create more sustainable educational and artistic partnerships. This is true not only of gamelan as an art form, but about cross cultural and international collaboration more generally.

Q: What is the most important idea you hope readers will take away from your book?

I hope that readers will expand their ideas of what arts education can be and be inspired to put in the time and effort to cultivate relationships with others with convergent interests from around the world.

Q: What do you like to read/watch/or listen to for fun?

I enjoy historical and science fiction, incisive and accurate Southern literature (I’m still a Floridian at heart), murder mysteries, and the rare, well-balanced romantic comedy. My ears are pretty open, since I spend my professional life thinking about music from across history and around the world—but I’m partial to anything that can make me dance.

The University of Illinois Press is pleased to introduce Elizabeth Hess as the Journals Marketing Assistant. Her responsibilities will include creating marketing and communication copy, press releases, and social media content for the 43 journals published by the Press. Hess comes to UIP from Research Press, where she served as an editor and publishing assistant. She began work with us on September 8, 2020.

“Elizabeth’s experience in both media and academic publishing makes her the perfect addition to our team”, said Alexa Colella, Journals Marketing Manager. “We are so excited to have her join the Press!”

Hess holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In her role at Research Press, she was responsible for editing and formatting manuscripts, while working with production on finalizing design and layout. Once the books were ready for print, Hess strategized with the authors on the best way to market the material. Prior to working in publishing, she worked in radio as a news anchor, reporter, columnist and talk show host. She is excited about her new role at the University of Illinois Press.

The University of Illinois Press seeks an Acquisition Editor/Senior Acquisitions Editor to be a member of the acquisitions program involved in discussions of focus and direction of publishing program. This position is responsible for acquiring at least 20 to 25 books per year that have scholarly merit and commercial viability and that support the mission of the Press.

This position will build and expand lists in a number of humanities and social science disciplines, helping achieve goals set by Press Director and Editor-in-Chief for acquisitions program. This position will also mentor junior staff and engage in outward facing activities such as publishing talks. At the senior level, the position assists the editor-in-chief in managing acquisitions department.

The University of Illinois is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action employer that recruits and hires qualified candidates without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, national origin, disability or veteran status. For more information, visit http://go.illinois.edu/EEO.

Duties and Responsibilities

Develop lists in relevant subject areas

1.       Recruit, develop, and initiate worthwhile book projects. Evaluate submissions. Identify outside reviewers and send them proposals and manuscripts for scholarly evaluation. Maintain professional and productive relations with authors, series editors, and other Press departments.

2.       Prepare descriptions of projects (both oral and written) and present to press committees and boards. Report periodically regarding academic fields being handled to Editor-in-Chief and other acquisitions editors.

3.       Estimate costs and revenues for projects under consideration. Identify sources of outside funding and secure grants to offset publishing expenses. Negotiate contracts.

4.       Ensure authors’ adherence to schedules, formatting guidelines, and permissions requirements in preparing approved manuscripts for transmission to the Editorial Department.

Outreach

1.       Represent the Press at scholarly meetings and conferences, keeping abreast of developments in the academic fields of acquisition. Some travel required.

2.       Present publishing talks and workshops that increase the visibility of the Press to the University and the scholarly community more broadly.

3.       Contribute to a culture of teamwork, continuous learning, and collegiality within the department and with other groups at the Press. Foster innovation and cross-departmental collaboration and contribute to Presswide initiatives. Serve as a positive representative of the Press to the public.

Staff development

1.       Train, mentor, advise, and supervise acquisitions staff as needed. Participate in professional development initiatives.

Other

1.      Other duties and responsibilities appropriate for an Acquisitions or Senior Acquisitions Editor.

Additional Duties and Responsibilities – Senior Acquisitions Editor

1.       Assist the editor-in-chief in managing acquisitions department.

2.       In consultation with the editor-in-chief serve in leadership role in departmental meetings and/or retreats.

Education and Experience – Acquisition Editor

Required:

1.       Bachelor’s degree.

2.       Two years of publishing experience demonstrating knowledge of and commitment to advancing and advocating for scholarship. Master’s degree may be substituted for one (1) year of work experience.

Education and Experience – Senior Acquisition Editor

Required:

1.       Five or more years of work in book publishing, with at least two years of full-time experience in acquiring scholarly or serious trade books.

Preferred:

1.       Graduate degree.

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities

1.       Track record of working successfully with scholars.

2.       High degree of organization and follow-through.

3.       Excellent verbal and written communication skills.

4.       Excellent networking skills.

5.       Computer proficiency.

6.       Ability to balance multiple competing demands.

7.       Intellectual curiosity.

8.       Ability to inspire trust.

9.       Acquisitions and/ or scholarly publishing experience in the humanities and/or humanistic social sciences. Familiarity with subject areas and scholarly networks within history and American studies, women’s, gender, and sexuality studies, and/or African-American studies.

10.   Familiarity with all stages of the publishing process.

Salary And Appointment Information

This is a full-time Civil Service Program Assistant position appointed on a 12 month service basis. The expected start date is as soon as possible after October 5, 2020. Salary is commensurate with experience.

To Apply

Applications must be received by October 5, 2020. Apply for this position by going to http://jobs.illinois.edu.  If you have not applied before, you must create your candidate profile at http://jobs.illinois.edu.  If you already have a profile, you will be redirected to that existing profile via email notification.

You can see the job posting on the U of I job board here: https://jobs.illinois.edu/academic-job-board/job-details?jobID=135680&job=acquisition-editor-senior-acquisitions-editor-135680

Applications not submitted through this website will not be considered. For further information about this specific position, contact Angela Foster at anfoster@uillinois.edu  For questions about the application process, please contact 217-333-2137.

Founded in 1918, the University of Illinois Press publishes approximately 90 books per year and 40 journal titles in the humanities and social sciences. The Press is located in Champaign-Urbana, a comfortable and lively city offering the best of small town living and urban amenities. Champaign-Urbana features a world-class performing arts facility, top tier research library, excellent schools, diverse and affordable living accommodations, an extensive park system, a commercial airport, and an award-winning public transportation system. Chicago is easily accessible by Amtrak or car. St. Louis and Indianapolis are also within easy driving distance.

Author of Upon the Altar of Work: Child Labor and the Rise of a New American Sectionalism, Betsy Wood answers questions about her influences, discoveries, and motivations for writing her new book.

Q: Why did you decide to write this book?

I wanted to understand how North-South conflict, rooted in the slavery crisis, influenced modern American capitalist society. It seemed to me that historians weren’t really connecting the 19th and 20th centuries in a way that would illuminate this influence. A lot of the scholarship on North-South relations after the Civil War emphasized white sectional reconciliation. And scholarship on consumer capitalism in the early twentieth century argued that the new economic order represented a break with the 19th century. 

Early on in my research, I came across an abolitionist pamphlet in which the writer lamented that enslaved children in the South were not receiving wages for their labor and, therefore, not able to learn important values from their labor. I wondered why this abolitionist wasn’t more concerned that these children were required to labor at all. The writer went on to brag about how Northern children did receive wages for their labor and were therefore learning how to become independent and “free.” I scribbled “child labor” in my notebook followed by exclamation points. I realized that the labor of different groups of children – and how people reacted to this issue – was tied up with the North-South conflict over slavery. And I knew that “child labor” had become an iconic struggle in the modern industrial period. I wondered if anyone had traced this issue over time, in both North and South, to see how these debates had evolved from the sectional crisis over slavery. When I consulted the secondary literature and found that no one had approached the issue from this angle, I knew I had found my book!

Q: Who were your biggest influences?

My work is indebted to so many scholars, especially the historians I worked with at the University of Chicago. Thomas C. Holt, Julie Saville, Catherine Brekus, Tara Zahra, Amy Dru Stanley, and many others there encouraged me to ask probing historical questions about capitalism, slavery, work, and freedom. Having these scholars as my interlocutors was by far the biggest influence on this book. Each of them modeled the kind of perceptive historical analysis I aspired to, and each has shaped this book immeasurably. 

Eric Foner has been a critical influence, especially his work on free labor. David Brion Davis’s work on antislavery helped me to conceptualize moral problems within capitalist society, and T.J. Jackson Lears’ work on antimodernist movements at the turn of the century influenced my thinking about cultural resistance to consumer capitalism. I’ve also been influenced by many historians of the American South, including Barbara Fields, Stephanie McCurry, Rebecca Scott, Steven Hahn, and William A. Link as well as historians of childhood that have paved the way for this kind of history, including James Schmidt, Ruth Wallis Herndon, John E. Murray, Shelley Sallee, Gary Cross, Walter Trattner, Hugh Hindman, and others.

Betsy Wood is a Professor of History at Hudson County Community College.

Q: What is the most interesting discovery you made while researching and writing your book?

That free labor ideology, once the heart of antislavery Republicanism and child rescue efforts in the North before the Civil War, resurfaced in the rural South and became the heart of a Southern capitalist vision and opposition to child labor regulation in the modern industrial era. It’s such a delicious historical irony! 

Q: What myths do you hope your book will dispel or what do you hope your book will help readers unlearn? 

We usually learn that child labor existed a long time ago, was very bad and, thankfully, was abolished by reformers. I hope my book helps readers to unlearn this simple tale of progress in favor of a new understanding that child labor was actually a hotly contested issue for more than 80 years of American history. The legacy of these disagreements – which broke down along sectional lines between the North and South and intersected in important ways with gender, race, and class – influenced the modern industrial era just as much as did the eventual passage of a federal child labor law. Even the child labor provisions of the New Deal that we are taught “outlawed” child labor in America were much more limited than what reformers sought, which reflected how contentious this issue was. 

Q: What is the most important idea you hope readers will take away from your book?

It’s hard for me to narrow it down to just one. Here are a few ideas, stated briefly. That sectionalist conflict continues in capitalist society. That the roots of the alliance between rural America and big business can be traced back to the 1920s around the child labor issue. That racism / white supremacy shows up in unexpected places in American history, including the iconic and celebrated struggle to abolish child labor. That capitalists in America have long fanned the flames of North-South conflict for their own gain. These are a few of the important ideas that I hope readers will take away. 

Q: What do you like to read/watch/or listen to for fun?

I’m a big fan of memoir—I’m currently reading Trevor Noah’s Born a Crime, which is absolutely spellbinding! I also love anything by Joan Didion or Anne Lamott. Before I was a professional historian, I dabbled in poetry so I continue to read my favorites like Mary Oliver, Tim Seibles, and Naomi Shihab Nye. 

I think some of the most creative filmmaking being done is in animation, which is fortunate since my viewing companion is often my 5-year old son! Some of my recent favorites are “Coco,” “Smallfoot,” “Toy Story IV,” “Frozen II,” and “Zootopia.” I also love all the recent live-action remakes of animated classics.

Although my taste in music is pretty eclectic, I have a special affinity for Americana, folk, and alt-country. A few staples are Emmylou Harris, Willie Nelson, Kacey Musgraves, and Joni Mitchell. Singing and writing songs is actually my favorite hobby! I grew up singing in church and performing in talent shows, so I enjoy singing and playing guitar at Open Mic nights in Jersey City, NJ. 


Author, Richard C. Crepeau, of NFL Football: A History of America’s New National Pastime , NFL Centennial Edition answers questions about his inspirations, discoveries and dispels myths about sports. You can read his Q&A for the first edition here.

Q: Why did you decide to write this book?

With the 50th Anniversary of the NFL it seemed that an update of the first edition was in order.

Q: Who were your biggest influences?

Michael Oriard, David Harris, Michael MacCambridge, and Craig Coenen who were authors of major histories of the NFL.

Q: What is the most interesting discovery you made while researching and writing your book?

It is not really a discovery so much as a confirmation of the power of the NFL over the media that covers it, especially television.

Q: What myths do you hope your book will dispel or what do you hope your book will help readers unlearn?

Richard C. Crepeau is a professor of history at the University of Central Florida and former president of the North American Society for Sports History. He is the author of Baseball: America’s Diamond Mind, 1919–1941.

The myth that sports builds character and the owners of the NFL are sportsmen and not businessmen.

Q: What is the most important idea you hope readers will take away from your book?

The idea that the NFL is not so much about football as it is about business and power.

Q: What do you like to read/watch/or listen to for fun?

Baseball, Hockey, Ballet, classical music, and jazz.

We are delighted to announce that Alison Syring has been promoted to the rank of acquisitions editor. Alison was our first ’Round the Press intern and was hired as an assistant acquisitions editor in 2017. She earned an MFA in creative writing from UIUC, and has a varied background in publishing work, especially on the production side. She has been very capably handling projects from our former acquisitions editor James Englehardt’s lists (labor history, Appalachian studies) as well as projects our former senior acquisitions editor Dawn Durante had underway in women’s studies and African-American studies. Going forward, she will be handling labor studies, disability studies, radical studies, Appalachian studies, religion (including Mormon studies), Illinois history, and digital humanities.

Alison says, “I am very excited to move into this new role at Illinois. It is inspiring to take over historical lists, like labor studies, that have made critical interventions in the field for many years, as well as newer lists that continue growing and developing. I am so grateful to have worked with talented editors who mentored me toward this position, and I look forward to continuing to learn and grow with this opportunity.”

Please join us in congratulating Alison and welcoming her to this new role!

Author, Andrea Wenzel, of Community Centered Journalism: Engaging People, Exploring Solutions, and Building Trust answers questions about her influences for writing, discoveries and myths she hopes to dispel for readers.

Q: Why did you decide to write this book?

I’ve been worried about journalism’s trust problem since the time when I worked as a journalist, long before 2016. To me the problem has always had two sides. Yes, people may not trust journalists. But I’ve been equally vexed by the lack of trust journalists have had in the public—assuming that professionals should always be the gatekeepers and enforcers of “objectivity.” At the same time, over the years I encountered, and sometimes participated in, promising media projects that seemed to be finding ways to share power with communities. These seemed, at least in small ways, to contribute to healthier dialogue on community issues. I wanted to dig into what makes these scenarios possible and how they might contribute to the health of communities.

Q: Who were your biggest influences?

When I went back to pursue my doctorate after working as a practitioner for 15 years, I was initially dismayed by a lack of connective tissue between scholarship and practice. I was exceptionally lucky to find Sandra Ball-Rokeach and her Metamorphosis Project research group at USC that took a change-oriented approach to building and applying communication theory. Their work showed me it was possible to use academic research as a pathway to designing and assessing applied interventions. I have also been influenced by the many community members I had the good fortune to work with as a practitioner, as they crafted their own local and global stories—whether those stories came from Chicago or Sri Lanka. I especially learned from my Afghan colleagues at AEPO who used community-based research to inform how they developed their radio programs that aired in local languages on the BBC in Afghanistan.

Q: What is the most interesting discovery you made while researching and writing your book?

I had the opportunity to talk with people who lived in what seemed like very different places and life circumstances in the U.S.—for example in rural areas in Western Kentucky and urban neighborhoods like South Los Angeles. Despite differences in race and political affiliation, I was struck by the similarities in how they expressed their distrust of news media and frustration with how they were represented. For example, in each of these locations, residents said they suspected reporters deliberately tried to interview people who had bad teeth. There was a deep feeling of neglect, disrespect, and distance from power. This made me want to understand if trust-building processes might offer a way not only to strengthen communication within communities, but perhaps down the line, to establish some common ground for dialogue across difference.

Andrea Wenzel was a radio producer for fifteen years and is currently an assistant professor of journalism, media, and communications at Temple University.

Q: What myths do you hope your book will dispel or what do you hope your book will help readers unlearn?

I hope readers will consider letting go of a few myths associated with journalism in the U.S. The first is the idea that trust is something that needs to be “rebuilt.” For many marginalized communities there was never a golden age with relationships of trust with journalists. Mutual trust requires building from scratch. The second is the idea that we should always be seeking to “scale” local journalism interventions. I argue you can replicate a process model of assessing needs and designing interventions, but the actual shape and form of the intervention will be different depending on the community’s needs and assets.

Q: What is the most important idea you hope readers will take away from your book?

If we want communities to thrive, we need to create infrastructure for healthy communication to support them. This is different than wanting to “save” journalism for journalism’s sake. Centering communities (especially those that have historically been marginalized) and their needs allows us to reimagine what journalism, or more broadly the sharing of information and stories, looks like. It will, and should, look different in different places.

Q: What do you like to read/watch/or listen to for fun?

Right now, I am solo-parenting a 6-month old so my literature consists mostly of children’s books whose value are judged based on my daughter’s tastes, literally. But when I can, I have a soft spot for podcasts and shows that explore the intersection of food, culture, and race—and escapist British mystery shows.

Jonathan R. Eller, author of Bradbury Beyond Apollo, the final book in his trilogy biography of Ray Bradbury, answers questions about his reasoning for writing a trilogy, academic and literary influences, and all-things science fiction.

Q: Why did you decide to write this book?

Bradbury Beyond Apollo completes a biographical trilogy—what began in Becoming Ray Bradbury and continued in Ray Bradbury Unbound remained incomplete until I could tell the story of Ray Bradbury’s final four decades. He approved this project in the fall of 2004, providing answers to countless questions and access to his personal archives as I wrote the first two volumes. Since his passing, his remaining archives and office have been preserved in the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies, where I was able to complete Bradbury Beyond Apollo just as his centennial year of 2020 began.

Q: Who were your biggest influences?

As with most biographers, I found that the central influence was the subject’s life. I had read Bradbury since the early 1960s, starting with his wide-ranging collection, The Golden Apples of the Sun. Beginning in the late 1980s, I had the great good fortune to get to know him, work on various limited editions of his works, and eventually spend time with him as I gathered the basis for four books on his life and career. Donn Albright, Bradbury’s good friend and principal bibliographer, along with writer and close Bradbury friend William F. Nolan, have been influential advisors over the years through their deep personal knowledge of Ray Bradbury’s life. But Bradbury Beyond Apollo, like it’s two prequels, is really a biography of the mind; as I worked with Ray Bradbury and his office library, I came under the influence of writers who had inspired Bradbury’s fantasies of space and time, including Edgar Allan Poe, Jules Verne, H.G. Wells, Leigh Brackett, John Collier, Cornell Woolrich, Robert Nathan, Nigel Kneale, and Shirley Jackson.

Q: What is the most interesting discovery you made while researching and writing your book?

Perhaps the most interesting discovery in researching Bradbury Beyond Apollo involved the improbable journey of a digital copy of The Martian Chronicles to the surface of the planet Mars. In 1992, Planetary Society founders Carl Sagan, Bruce Murray, and Lou Friedman developed an “ABCs of Science Fiction” Project that was scheduled to carry novels by Isaac Asimov, Ray Bradbury, and Arthur C. Clarke to the Red Planet aboard a Russian lander. The vehicle and the digitized CD missed its Martian trajectory boost and fell back to Earth, but The Planetary Society never gave up the mission. In 2008, America’s Phoenix lander arrived in the high northern latitudes of Mars, carrying a far more sophisticated DVD full of science fiction by many writers. The Martian Chronicles text on the Phoenix DVD included cover art by Michael Whelan and an influential 1950s introduction by Jorge Luis Borges.

Jonathan R. Eller is a Chancellor’s Professor of English at Indiana University-Purdue University in Indianapolis.

Q: What myths do you hope your book will dispel or what do you hope your book will help readers unlearn?

It is important to learn that Ray Bradbury was not just a writer for mid-century America who’s widely read stories of other worlds outpaced his limited understanding of science and technology. Bradbury understood the workings of the human heart—how we dream, how we learn, and how we remember the past in order to shape our future. Bradbury did not mistrust technology; he mistrusted those who misuse technology for their own ends. Looking back from the final pages of Bradbury Beyond Apollo, we can see that generations of astronomers, astrophysicists, planetary geologists, aerospace engineers, and astronauts were inspired by Ray Bradbury’s imagination. They grew beyond what he had to teach, but they never forgot the lessons learned.

Q: What is the most important idea you hope readers will take away from your book?

The most important premise in Bradbury Beyond Apollo ties together all the many creative trails he followed during the last forty years of his seventy-year career. Witnessing and celebrating the great tale of space exploration changed the trajectory of his role in American culture. His deepest convictions would surface more frequently in essays and lectures, and less so in the ever-diminishing output of new stories. His felt purpose had become that of a visionary, “asked over and over again to tell us why we desire to explore, why we should go to the stars, and what we might become when we get there.”

Q: What do you like to read/watch/or listen to for fun?

Bradbury felt that science fiction is premised on the possible, fantasy on the impossible. We need a mixture of both impulses in our lives. I read the kind of science fiction that Bradbury found most compelling, science fiction that focuses on what makes us human, and what keeps us human as we journey to other worlds. I also enjoy the kind of fantasy that centers on the world of libraries, a world that Bradbury also loved beyond measure. The “Literary Detective” world of Jasper Fford’s Thursday Next novels are a great source of enjoyment, as are the more recent Invisible Library novels of Genevieve Cogman.

Welcome to the Press’s 2020 ASALH Virtual Exhibit! Browse our newest Black studies titles, as well as journals that disseminate Black studies scholarship. And use Promo Code ASALH20 to get 50% off all our African American studies titles! Plus, when you buy 3 books, you’ll get a free copy of the Fall/Winter 2020 issue of the Journal of Civil and Human Rights.

Browse our African American and African Diaspora Studies Subject Catalog

New and Forthcoming Books

Attend Koritha Mitchell’s Virtual Book Launch!

Download Our September Free E-Book

Our September free e-book is To Turn the Whole World Over: Black Women and Internationalism edited by Keisha N. Blain and Tiffany M. Gill. Released in 2019, this title is a collection of cutting-edge essays on black women’s internationalism in this pivotal era and beyond. Download your free copy today!

UIP Journals Featuring Black Studies Scholarship

Journal of Civil and Human Rights (JCHR) is a peer-reviewed, interdisciplinary, academic journal dedicated to studying modern U.S.-based social justice movements and freedom struggles, including transnational ones, and their antecedents, influence, and legacies. 

Women, Gender, and Families of Color is a multidisciplinary journal that centers on the study of Black, Latina, Indigenous, and Asian American women, gender, and families.

The 1619 Project Reading Lists

August 2019 marked the 400th anniversary of slaves arriving in America. To commemorate the anniversary, The New York Times Magazine launched the 1619 Project, a major initiative led by Nikole Hannah-Jones, with the goal of re-framing our understanding of the impact of slavery and recognizing the contributions of Black Americans to American democracy.  We invite you to explore our related reading lists alongside the 1619 Project and consider how we can use this important scholarship to move forward as a nation towards an antiracist future. Check out our 1619 Project Reading Lists.

Blackness in the Media and The History of the Black Press Reading Lists

From depictions of horror and violence against African Americans, representations of the Black Panthers and Civil Rights movement, hypersexualizaton of Black and mixed Black women, to Black expression on the big and small screens, this list of titles explores how the media has shaped the public’s perception of acceptable blackness and the ways it has depicted black suffering and achievement. Find our Blackness in the Media Reading List on the UIP blog.

This spring, we were delighted to add E. James West’s book on Ebony and Kim Gallon’s book on Black readership and sexuality in the Black press to our list. Discover our titles about the history of the Black press.

New Books in the New Black Studies Series

The New Black Studies Series celebrates Black scholarship, featuring fresh, provocative perspectives in Black studies. Over fifteen years, the series has published fifty books by sixty-five authors and editors and has garnered over seventeen awards, including some of the most prestigious accolades across the fields of history, literature, and African American studies. This year we have eight new books joining the series. Take a look at the fifteenth anniversary catalog and our new and upcoming books in the series! Read more on the UIP blog.

From Inside The Callout





Read about our titles on Black Americans in Chicago, featured in the Spring 2020 issue of The Callout.

Music and Black Studies

To celebrate the June 2020 release of Always the Queen, written by Denise LaSalle and David Whiteis, we created a playlist that showcases several songs mentioned in the book. Enjoy LaSalle’s musical evolution and pick up a copy of Always the Queen to learn more about her inspiring life.

Further Reading from Our Authors

The University of Illinois Press seeks an energetic and detail-oriented Assistant Acquisitions Editor. This position works closely with the Press’s acquisitions staff in supporting the development and acquisition of a robust list of general interest and scholarly titles in a range of humanities and social science disciplines. The Assistant Acquisitions Editor provides skilled administrative support to acquisitions editors in managing the cultivation of prospective authors, the development and evaluation of manuscripts, the preparation of projects for transmittal into production, and other aspects of project management entailed in guiding new book projects through all phases of the acquisitions process.

The University of Illinois is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action employer that recruits and hires qualified candidates without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, national origin, disability or veteran status. For more information, visit http://go.illinois.edu/EEO.

Additional responsibilities

Support list development

  • Assist editors with evaluating and processing submissions: create project records, coordinate and track peer review, obtain cost estimates and art assessments, and prepare and distribute project descriptions and packets for committee discussions.
  • Work with authors to finalize their submissions and prepare manuscripts for transmittal to production: assess permissions and captions; assess formatting of final electronic text files; coordinate evaluation of images; obtain cost estimates; deposit final files and images on server; and identify images available for promotional use.
  • Prepare project descriptions and other materials for committee discussions. Research book projects, series, and sources of outside funding. Provide support in preparing grant applications.

Outreach

  • Attend scholarly meetings and conferences on behalf of the Press. Maintain professional and productive relations with authors, series editors, and other Press departments. Serve as positive representative of the Press to the public. Some travel required.
  • Contribute to a culture of teamwork, continuous learning, and collegiality within the department and with other groups at the Press. Foster innovation and cross-departmental collaboration and contribute to Presswide initiatives.

Staff development

  • Participate in hiring and training initiatives, and in professional development initiatives, as appropriate.

Other

  • Other duties and responsibilities appropriate for an Assistant Acquisitions Editor.

Education and Experience

Required: Bachelor’s degree in a humanities, social science or related field.

Preferred: Pertinent experience in book publishing or related enterprises (e.g., magazine publishing, library, bookstore, newspaper, Yearbook, public relations).

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities

  1. Strong organizational and follow-through skills.
  2. Ability to communicate clearly and professionally with authors and colleagues.
  3. Ability to track multiple projects, meet deadlines, prioritize, and work under pressure.
  4. Experience with word processing, database, internet, and Microsoft computer applications.
  5. Sharp proofreading skills.
  6. Independent problem solver and open to challenges.

SALARY AND APPOINTMENT INFORMATION


This is a full-time Civil Service Program Assistant position appointed on a 12 month service basis. The expected start date is as soon as possible after September 17, 2020. Salary is commensurate with experience.

TO APPLY

Applications must be received by September 17, 2020.

Apply for this position using the “Apply for Position” button on the U of I Job Board: https://jobs.illinois.edu/academic-job-board/job-details?jobID=134854&job=assistant-acquisitions-editor-134854 

If you have not applied before, you must create your candidate profile at http://jobs.illinois.edu

Applications not submitted through the job board will not be considered. For further information about this specific position, contact Angela Foster at anfoster@uillinois.edu. For questions about the application process, please contact 217-333-2137.

Founded in 1918, the University of Illinois Press publishes approximately 90 books per year and 40 journal titles in the humanities and social sciences. The Press is located in Champaign-Urbana, a comfortable and lively city offering the best of small town living and urban amenities. Champaign-Urbana features a world-class performing arts facility, top tier research library, excellent schools, diverse and affordable living accommodations, an extensive park system, a commercial airport, and an award-winning public transportation system. Chicago is easily accessible by Amtrak or car. St. Louis and Indianapolis are also within easy driving distance.