Category Archives: American literature

Kay Boyle published more than forty books during her life including fifteen novels, and eight volumes of poetry. Yet her achievements can be even better appreciated through her letters to the literary and cultural titans of her time. Sandra Spanier, … Continue reading

The Global Studies of the United States series, presents outstanding work by non-U.S.-based scholars who specialize in American studies. One of those authors recently traveled to the United States (in fact the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana campus), to share a perspective … Continue reading

This week is Banned Book Week, one of those observances that never loses its relevance. For proof, turn to the list of frequently challenged books, as charted by the American Library Association. It is a gloomy reminder of fear and small-mindedness, … Continue reading

Over the weekend, geek culture daily-must-visit site I09 wrote up UIP’s acclaimed Modern Masters of Science Fiction series. We express thanks for their kind praise. Please have a look at the article.

James T. Farrell’s childhood coincided with a period in history when “real” Americans considered the Irish colorful—and usually undesirable—exotics. His omnibus novel Studs Lonigan and collection Chicago Stories reflected the Irish-American experience of a generation of people who worked themselves to exhaustion, and death, to attain … Continue reading

Two UIP titles are now available in paperback editions. Denise Levertov: A Poet’s Life Called by Kenneth Rexroth “the most subtly skillful poet of her generation,” British-born Denise Levertov authored twenty-four volumes of poetry, four books of essays, and several … Continue reading

Julian Hawthorne hustled. An independent contractor par excellence, the son of Nathaniel Hawthorne reported on foreign wars and domestic politics, published novels, penned short stories, dreamt up theosophist blarney, raked muck, churned out ad copy, and wrote whatever else was … Continue reading

On Friday, March 14, 2014, Koritha Mitchell, author of  Living with Lynching:  African American Lynching Plays, Performance, and Citizenship, 1890-1930, spoke at the James Madison Memorial Building of the Library of Congress. At the event Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee presented the author with a … Continue reading

Harlem Renaissance author Zora Neale Hurston was born on January 7, 1891. Also an American folklorist and anthropologist, Hurston wrote short stories, plays, essays and four novels including Their Eyes Were Watching God. UIP has published a number of projects in relation … Continue reading

Brian Dolinar is a scholar of African American literature and culture from the Depression era. He is the editor of The Negro in Illinois: The WPA Papers. We asked him some questions about this unique project of scholarly recovery.  Q: How … Continue reading