Category Archives: labor history

Religion has played a protean role in the lives of America’s workers. Matthew Pehl focuses on Detroit to examine the religious consciousness constructed by the city’s working-class Catholics, African American Protestants, and southern-born white evangelicals and Pentecostals between 1910 and … Continue reading

Today marks National Noodle Day, an observance that simultaneously celebrates a food most beloved of preschoolers and college students while making you wonder if this national day trend has gone too far. At UIP we take no stance on the question—it’s … Continue reading

Social activist and influential executive secretary of the National Urban League Eugene Kinckle Jones was born on July 30, 1885. Felix L. Armfield‘s biography Eugene Kinckle Jones: The National Urban League and Black Social Work, 1910-1940 details the life an impact … Continue reading

Frank Zeidler transformed Milwaukee during his three terms as mayor of the Wisconsin city. However, the kind of change that Zeidler, a member of the Socialist Party of America, brought to Milwaukee was not well met by everyone. Mid-century conservatives … Continue reading

Nick Fischer is Adjunct Research Fellow of the School of Philosophical, Historical and International Studies at Monash University, Melbourne. He answered some questions about his book Spider Web: The Birth of American Anticommunism. Q: How does the term “spider web” describe the anticommunist movement … Continue reading

For years, native Hawaiians had fought with a modest degree of success to maintain their autonomy. But in 1893, white businessmen—sugar magnates and the like—had taken control by tossing out Hawaii’s last monarch and organizing their own provisional government. Not … Continue reading

Late last week the eminent labor historian James Green died at age 71. Known most recently for his The Devil Is Here in These Hills, a portrait of West Virginia coal miners that became part of an American Experience documentary, Green changed the field with his … Continue reading

The Stone Age had its cavepeople and thyroidal mammals, the Bronze Age its Hoplites and long poems, the Iron Age its hillforts and bog mummies. The Steel Age seldom gets its due. Oh, it overlaps with the Iron Age, there … Continue reading

The Organization of American Historians Annual Meeting in Providence, Rhode Island, April 7-10, 2016 was a great opportunity for editors and staff from the Press to congregate with people in the field of history (and perhaps check into future acquisitions … Continue reading

Struggle for the Soul of the Postwar South: White Evangelical Protestants and Operation Dixie by Elizabeth Fones-Wolf and Ken Fones-Wolf has won the David Montgomery Award from the Organization of American Historians (OAH) for the best book on a topic … Continue reading