Category Archives: labor history

The Organization of American Historians Annual Meeting in Providence, Rhode Island, April 7-10, 2016 was a great opportunity for editors and staff from the Press to congregate with people in the field of history (and perhaps check into future acquisitions … Continue reading

Struggle for the Soul of the Postwar South: White Evangelical Protestants and Operation Dixie by Elizabeth Fones-Wolf and Ken Fones-Wolf has won the David Montgomery Award from the Organization of American Historians (OAH) for the best book on a topic … Continue reading

If you are headed to the Organization of American Historians Annual Meeting in Providence, Rhode Island during April 7-9 there are a few things you’ll want to be on the lookout for courtesy of your friends at UIP. 1) Given … Continue reading

Though another state calls itself the Crossroads of America, Illinois deserves the title as much as any of the Lower 48, for here the prairie gathers the railroads and interstates to itself before the American transportation flares out onto the Plains … Continue reading

David Lucander, author Winning the War for Democracy: The March on Washington Movement, 1941-1946, was recognized by the African American Historical Society of Rockland County (NY) with this year’s Griot Award. The award is given “for outstanding contributions in transmitting … Continue reading

Pretty much every world religion and ethical system makes a virtue of offering succor to travelers, the rootless, and the persecuted. Immigration, the social-political system we’ve constructed around those ideas, plays a vital role in the narratives of many nations. … Continue reading

Robert Bussel is a professor of history and director of the Labor Education and Research Center at the University of Oregon. He answered some questions about his book Fighting for Total Person Unionism: Harold Gibbons, Ernest Calloway, and Working-Class Citizenship. Q: What … Continue reading

This day in 1925, activist A. Philip Randolph led the organization of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, a campaign Randolph declared nothing less than “a significant landmark in the history and struggle of the Negro workers in America.” For … Continue reading

Eighty-five years ago today, out where the warm trade winds blow, Don Ho began life in Hawai’i, one of the nicer outposts of our current reality. In time, his mellow singing entertained so many people that Don became synonymous with the … Continue reading

Journalist Marlene Sanders passed away earlier this week at age 84. In 1964, Sanders was the first woman to anchor an evening network news program when she substituted for Ron Cochran on ABC. This was just one of the many … Continue reading