Category Archives: music

For the tenth consecutive year, the University of Illinois Press will have a large presence at the Chicago Tribune Printers Row Lit Fest.  Festival goers can visit the University of Illinois Press tent on Dearborn Street, between Congress and Polk. … Continue reading

The average person considers a university press a rather humorless concern. Just look at a catalog and you’ll see pages of works by serious scholars, many of whom insist on addressing the kaleidoscope of injustices humans visit upon other humans. While it’s … Continue reading

Amy C. Beal’s Carla Bley is an in-depth look at a the innovative jazz icon know for, among other things, her involvement in the Free Jazz movement. As Amy Beal writes in her American Composers series profile of the composer, pianist, … Continue reading

Longing for that down home music? Looking for a shot of brilliance? Tryin’ to forget that you asked for water and your woman/man gave you gasoline? Then you must be celebrating the 100th birthday (or it might be the 102nd birthday) of McKinley Morganfield, … Continue reading

The Creolization of American Culture: William Sidney Mount and the Roots of Blackface Minstrelsy by Christopher J. Smith has been awarded the Irving Lowens Book Award by the Society for American Music (SAM). The SAM award committee had this statement upon … Continue reading

Gary B. Reid’s introduction to the Stanley Brothers was a used record he picked up for 33 cents in 1973. That modest investment launched Reid on an odyssey that would culminate in “what just might be the definitive history of … Continue reading

Tonight, 300 public television stations will unleash a coast-to-coast replay of the classic Motown 25 special from 1983. Michael Jackson’s Moonwalk, reunions of Diana Ross and the Supremes and label-mates Smokey Robinson and the Miracles—trust us, children, it was a big deal at the … Continue reading

Stephen Wade, author of The Beautiful Music All Around Us, opened up his residency at the Milwaukee Repertory Theater’s  Stackner Cabaret on Sunday, January 18. There, the author/musician will spend the better part of the next eight weeks introducing audiences to the astonishing … Continue reading

On January 6, 1955 contralto Marian Anderson became the first African American soloist to sing at New York’s Metropolitan Opera. She appeared in the role of Ulrica (a Creole fortuneteller medium) in Verdi’s Un Ballo in Maschera. Born in 1897, Anderson’s parents moved to … Continue reading

Two UIP titles are now available in paperback editions. Denise Levertov: A Poet’s Life Called by Kenneth Rexroth “the most subtly skillful poet of her generation,” British-born Denise Levertov authored twenty-four volumes of poetry, four books of essays, and several … Continue reading