Category Archives: art

April’s free ebook is here! This time, we’re giving away Pink-Slipped: What Happened to Women in the Silent Film Industries? by Jane M. Gaines: Women held more positions of power in the silent film industry than at any other time … Continue reading

Bennetta Jules-Rosette and J.R. Osborn recently answered some questions about their new book, African Art Reframed: Reflections and Dialogues on Museum Culture. Q: Why did you decide to write this book?  We decided to write African Art Reframed for a … Continue reading

Susan Potter is lecturer in film studies at the University of Sydney. She recently answered some questions about her new book, Queer Timing: The Emergence of Lesbian Sexuality in Early Cinema. Q: Why did you decide to write this book? When I … Continue reading

The work of Italian engineer and builder Pier Luigi Nervi fascinates and inspires half a century after the completion of his best-known works. The spiraling, web-like patterns of his 1957 Palazzo dello Sport is still breathtaking in its span, scale, … Continue reading

Here are 5 new African American Studies books to keep an eye out for at ASALH this year. Make sure to stop by the UIP booth and check them out! 1.The Rise and Fall of the Associated Negro Press By … Continue reading

Today marks the birthday of famed sculptor Lorado Taft, born in 1860 in Elmwood, Illinois. A graduate of the Illinois Industrial University—forerunner of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign—Taft studied in France before returning to Chicago to make his reputation and … Continue reading

Today marks the birthday of Daniel Chester French, in his day one of America’s most popular sculptors. The famed often seem to have known the famed, and French was no different. May Alcott, Louisa’s sister, was the person who encouraged … Continue reading

Making Photography Matter: A Viewer’s History from the Civil War to the Great Depression by Cara A. Finnegan was recently awarded the James A. Winans and Herbert A. Wichelns Memorial Award for Distinguished Scholarship in Rhetoric and Public Address from … Continue reading

Generally considered a bummer of epic proportions, the Great Depression nonetheless inspired a measure of nostalgia. Americans looked back to a simpler time, of lives unencumbered by food, employment, homes, or arable Great Plains farmland. Liberals celebrated the halcyon days … Continue reading