Category Archives: women’s history

In the following post, Dr. Richa Nagar discusses the importance of politically engaged scholarship for scholar activists in the post-election climate. Dr. Nagar is a professor of gender, women, and sexuality studies at the University of Minnesota and is the … Continue reading

Shawn J. Parry-Giles is a professor of communication and director of the Center for Political Communication and Civic Leadership at the University of Maryland. Her UIP book Hillary Clinton in the News: Gender and Authenticity in American Politics basically predicted a huge chunk … Continue reading

Pretty much every world religion and ethical system makes a virtue of offering succor to travelers, the rootless, and the persecuted. Immigration, the social-political system we’ve constructed around those ideas, plays a vital role in the narratives of many nations. … Continue reading

This week, we received word that Jane C. Beck’s acclaimed book Daisy Turner’s Kin: An African American Family Saga, won two awards: the 2016 Chicago Folklore Prize and the 2016 Wayland D. Hand Prize. The Chicago Folklore Prize, the oldest international … Continue reading

Holly Welker, author of Baring Witness, recently sat down for a radio interview with the National Public Radio affiliate in Phoenix. Want an enlightening look at the world of Mormon marriage from women’s point of view? Tune in for the in-depth discussion … Continue reading

The new UIP release Slavery at Sea examines the infamous Middle Passage in a new light. Sowande’ Mustakeem reveals for the first time how slavery took critical shape at sea. Expanding the gaze even more deeply, the book centers how the oceanic transport … Continue reading

Teach the controversy! Like any academic press, UIP delves into the taboo, the transgressive, and the fringe. Such books reflect our belief that a lot of topics go unseen, and a lot of voices unheard, by the mainstream. TBT presents … Continue reading

Women filing gender-based asylum claims long faced skepticism and outright rejection within the U.S. immigration system. Despite erratic progress, the United States still fails to recognize gender as an established category for experiencing persecution. Gender exists in a sort of … Continue reading

From the new UIP release Black Girlhood in the Nineteenth Century, by Nazera Sadiq Wright.  African American educator and activist Fannie Barrier Williams highlighted what could happen when black girls in literature served merely to illustrate the problems associated with race … Continue reading

One of the Press’s more eagerly awaited recent titles, and a runaway hit at this summer’s Book Expo in Chicago, Baring Witness is now on sale. Acclaimed author-editor Holly Welker and thirty-six Mormon women write about devotion and love and luck, about … Continue reading