Category Archives: women’s history

It’s been awhile since I could legitimately sing, “Give me a head with hair/long, beautiful hair.” But the Cowsills, via America’s tribal love-rock musical, expressed the importance of the streamin’, flaxen, waxin’ locks with winning pop harmonies and frequent radio airplay. … Continue reading

Which came first, the cave painting or the story behind the images? Even anthropologists wonder. Storytelling is at least a contender for Second Human Art, cooking being the agreed-upon first, not that inadequately-cooked mammoth stuffed with termites would make the cover of Everyday … Continue reading

If you’re headed out to Milwaukee to soak up knowledge at the National Women’s Studies Association Conference, you’ll want to be prepared. That’s why we’ve come up with an essential UIP reading list for NWSA. Here are five books and … Continue reading

Daisy Turner, the shotgun-wielding centenarian, was someone Jane Beck was anxious to meet. Beck, the Executive Director Emeritus and Founder of the Vermont Folklife Center, recounted her first encounter with Daisy Turner on the Vermont PBS program Connect. “First and foremost, she was … Continue reading

Academic publishing often forces one into the unappreciated but necessary job of Killjoy. It comes with the territory of challenging convention and shoveling the cultural/historical b.s. out of the barn. Having stated such an attitude, we perhaps will not surprise you … Continue reading

During the American version of the 1997 Labor Day weekend, shocking news interrupted the barbeques. Princess Diana had died in a Paris car crash. One of the world’s most visible women, Diana replaced everything in the news for days, and … Continue reading

This day in 1925, activist A. Philip Randolph led the organization of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, a campaign Randolph declared nothing less than “a significant landmark in the history and struggle of the Negro workers in America.” For … Continue reading

Though the cupcake craze of recent years has abated somewhat, random organizations still want to give us excuses to eat these delicious items. We thank them. Yet the true date of National Cupcake Day remains in flux, with different declarations noting different days … Continue reading

Dirty Words: The Rhetoric of Public Sex Education, 1870-1924 by Robin E. Jensen has been awarded the 2015 NCA Health Communication Distinguished Book Award. In the book, Jensen details the approaches and outcomes of sex-education initiatives in the Progressive Era. The … Continue reading

Ethelene Whitmire has received  the 2015 Wheatley Book Award for First Nonfiction for her book Regina Anderson Andrews, Harlem Renaissance Librarian. The Wheatly Awards are presented by QBR: The Black Book Review and the Harlem Book Fair and were awarded at a reception in New … Continue reading