Category Archives: women’s history

During the American version of the 1997 Labor Day weekend, shocking news interrupted the barbeques. Princess Diana had died in a Paris car crash. One of the world’s most visible women, Diana replaced everything in the news for days, and … Continue reading

This day in 1925, activist A. Philip Randolph led the organization of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, a campaign Randolph declared nothing less than “a significant landmark in the history and struggle of the Negro workers in America.” For … Continue reading

Though the cupcake craze of recent years has abated somewhat, random organizations still want to give us excuses to eat these delicious items. We thank them. Yet the true date of National Cupcake Day remains in flux, with different declarations noting different days … Continue reading

Dirty Words: The Rhetoric of Public Sex Education, 1870-1924 by Robin E. Jensen has been awarded the 2015 NCA Health Communication Distinguished Book Award. In the book, Jensen details the approaches and outcomes of sex-education initiatives in the Progressive Era. The … Continue reading

Ethelene Whitmire has received  the 2015 Wheatley Book Award for First Nonfiction for her book Regina Anderson Andrews, Harlem Renaissance Librarian. The Wheatly Awards are presented by QBR: The Black Book Review and the Harlem Book Fair and were awarded at a reception in New … Continue reading

The Women’s World Cup reached its conclusion over the weekend. The U.S. team rained early goals on Japan and emerged with a 5-2 victory to win its first Cup since the triumph of the now-iconic 1999 team. Perhaps as noteworthy was the … Continue reading

Daisy Turner was a woman of many words. The storyteller and poet was a living repository of history. She related the stories of her own family, from the abduction of her ancestors in West Africa to her own upbringing in … Continue reading

June 3, or Wednesday if you please, marked the beginning of a sacred holiday. No, not the birthday of Anderson Cooper. June 3 saw the first game in the ritual-rich battle for a thyroidal Canadian tsotchke called the Stanley Cup. Hockey teams … Continue reading

Some would say Hillary Clinton makes news. But in the national mind it sometimes seems that Hillary Clinton is news, its very personification, an irresistible-to-media hybrid of politico, symbol, and celebrity sentenced to have every action scrutinized and elaborated upon to a … Continue reading

For the month of March 2015, to coincide with Women’s History Month, we have lowered the e-book list price of four titles in the University of Illinois Press catalog to $2.99. Anna Howard Shaw: The Work of Woman Suffrage by … Continue reading