Category Archives: women’s history

Forty-four years ago today, national feminist groups staged the Women’s Strike for Equality. “If the success of media activism is measured by the amount of news coverage generated, the Strike for Equality hit the mother lode,” Bonnie J. Dow reports … Continue reading

Today, the enlightened everywhere celebrate Women’s Equality Day, commemorating not only the Nineteenth Amendment giving half of American humanity the right to vote outside of Wyoming, but recognizing all of the advances made by women—while noting what work remains to … Continue reading

Groundbreaking athlete Althea Gibson was born on August 25, 1927. A member of the International Tennis Hall of Fame, Althea Gibson won 11 Grand Slam tournaments. She was also the first black athlete to break the color barrier in international … Continue reading

Born on July 23, 1971, Central Illinois native Alison Krauss has been awarded with more Grammys than any other female artist. The singer and fiddle player has put up sales numbers greater than any other living bluegrass act. Yet, as Murphy … Continue reading

Ethelene Whitmire is an associate professor of library and information studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She answered some questions about her book Regina Anderson Andrews, Harlem Renaissance Librarian. Q: Who was Regina Anderson Andrews and what role did she have in … Continue reading

Our Roots Run Deep as Ironweed: Appalachian Women and the Fight for Environmental Justice by Shannon Elizabeth Bell was recently the recipient of two awards. Our Roots Run Deep is a 2014 Silver Winner in Journalism/Investigative Reporting in the Nautilus … Continue reading

On Friday, March 14, 2014, Koritha Mitchell, author of  Living with Lynching:  African American Lynching Plays, Performance, and Citizenship, 1890-1930, spoke at the James Madison Memorial Building of the Library of Congress. At the event Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee presented the author with a … Continue reading

Anna Howard Shaw was a suffrage leader, an ordained minister, a physician and “an outrageous woman for her generation.” Trisha Franzen, a professor of women’s and gender studies at Albion College and the author Anna Howard Shaw: The Work of Woman … Continue reading

German composer Josephine Lang was born March 15, 1815. Lang, a prodigiously talented pianist and dedicated composer, participated at various times in the German Romantic world of lieder through her important arts salon. In her book Five Lives in Music: Women … Continue reading

Spotlight on Women’s History Month: Trisha Franzen, author of Anna Howard Shaw: The Work of Woman Suffrage writes about this feminist pioneer: It takes a lot of chutzpah for an unmarried woman to ask married women to donate their wedding … Continue reading