Category Archives: women’s history

It’s been awhile since I could legitimately sing, “Give me a head with hair/long, beautiful hair.” But the Cowsills, via America’s tribal love-rock musical, expressed the importance of the streamin’, flaxen, waxin’ locks with winning pop harmonies and frequent radio airplay. … Continue reading

Whenever the Olympic Games convene, we remember that the United States shares the planet with other countries. We also remember that many of the world’s people play team handball. At the University of Illinois Press, our authors journey by jet, balloon, donkey, clipper ship, … Continue reading

          Sex testing. It goes on in sports all the time. But it only makes headlines during the Olympics, when a giant for-profit sports behemoth famous for corruption and bribery interrupts its tireless quest to sell every … Continue reading

Progressive Era activist and reformer Fannie Barrier Williams was one of the most prominent educated African American women of her generation. A new effort to honor the woman who was a prominent spokesperson for economic, racial, and gender reforms has centered in Williams’ … Continue reading

Tonight, former U.S. Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton will throw down political style as she officially kicks off her bid for the White House. The speech will cap twenty-five years in a national spotlight that at various times lit Clinton in order … Continue reading

Well, less than 100 years after women won the right to vote, one of them is running for the White as the nominee of a major political party. Tonight, Hillary Clinton will accept the nomination for one of the world’s most … Continue reading

Lizzie Andrew Borden stood trial in New Bedford, Massachusetts, for the ax murders of her father and stepmother. This first of many American trials of the century began on June 5, 1893. Lurid details included allegations of poison and rotten mutton, an … Continue reading

The University of Illinois Press offers its congratulations to author Deepti Misri. Her recent UIP release Beyond Partition: Gender, Violence, and Representation in Postcolonial India received the 2016 Eugene M. Kayden Book Award in Literary Studies from the University of … Continue reading

I wouldn’t try being a mom for a million bucks. I’m not just talking about all the surgery it would require. Fatherhood is definitely its own cross to bear, don’t get me wrong. There’s a reason men die at a … Continue reading

In future years, when the 2010s become a matter of nostalgia and the “What were they thinking?”-related wonder enjoyed by every generation, people will laugh about the neckbeards, and the adult coloring books, and Dubsmash. When it comes to the … Continue reading