Category Archives: women’s history

In the new UIP release The Dumville Letters, Anne M. Heinz and John P. Heinz bring us the antebellum-era correspondence of Ann Dumville and her daughters Hepzibah, Jemima, and Elizabeth, as well as their acquaintances. Kept at the Lincoln Presidential Library in Springfield, the Dumville … Continue reading

It is no surprise that World War II, the most massive war in human history, receives the most attention from the publishing industry. Biography on figures like Churchill and FDR crowd the bookstore table, as do studies by military historians … Continue reading

A Hard Fight for We: Women’s Transition from Slavery to Freedom in South Carolina, by Leslie A. Schwalm African American women fought bravely and tenaciously for their freedom during the Civil War and after. Focusing on slave women on the … Continue reading

Today the Google Doodle swings to celebrating the birthday of Alice Paul. Born into a close-knit Quaker community, Paul inherited the passion of forebears who fought for abolition. In her case, the cause was women’s suffrage, and Paul took it … Continue reading

Pretty much every world religion and ethical system makes a virtue of offering succor to travelers, the rootless, and the persecuted. Immigration, the social-political system we’ve constructed around those ideas, plays a vital role in the narratives of many nations. … Continue reading

It’s been awhile since I could legitimately sing, “Give me a head with hair/long, beautiful hair.” But the Cowsills, via America’s tribal love-rock musical, expressed the importance of the streamin’, flaxen, waxin’ locks with winning pop harmonies and frequent radio airplay. … Continue reading

Which came first, the cave painting or the story behind the images? Even anthropologists wonder. Storytelling is at least a contender for Second Human Art, cooking being the agreed-upon first, not that inadequately-cooked mammoth stuffed with termites would make the cover of Everyday … Continue reading

If you’re headed out to Milwaukee to soak up knowledge at the National Women’s Studies Association Conference, you’ll want to be prepared. That’s why we’ve come up with an essential UIP reading list for NWSA. Here are five books and … Continue reading

Daisy Turner, the shotgun-wielding centenarian, was someone Jane Beck was anxious to meet. Beck, the Executive Director Emeritus and Founder of the Vermont Folklife Center, recounted her first encounter with Daisy Turner on the Vermont PBS program Connect. “First and foremost, she was … Continue reading

Academic publishing often forces one into the unappreciated but necessary job of Killjoy. It comes with the territory of challenging convention and shoveling the cultural/historical b.s. out of the barn. Having stated such an attitude, we perhaps will not surprise you … Continue reading