Category Archives: black studies

Darlene Clark Hine, co-editor of The New Black Studies Series, has been awarded with the 2013 National Humanities Medal. President Barack Obama presented the award to Hine at the White House on Monday, July 28. She is one of 10 … Continue reading

Barbara Foley is a professor of English at Rutgers University-Newark. She is the author of Spectres of 1919: Class and Nation in the Making of the New Negro. She answered some questions about her book Jean Toomer: Race, Repression, and Revolution. Q: … Continue reading

Ethelene Whitmire is an associate professor of library and information studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She answered some questions about her book Regina Anderson Andrews, Harlem Renaissance Librarian. Q: Who was Regina Anderson Andrews and what role did she have in … Continue reading

Jimmy Rogers was born James A. Lane on this day in 1924. As Wayne Everett Goins notes in Blues All Day Long, his new biography of Rogers, the legendary guitarist carried a no-nonsense version of how he came to be. … Continue reading

On May 17, 1954 the United States Supreme Court handed down a ruling that “separate educational facilities are inherently unequal.” This was the landmark ruling on Brown v. Board of Education which changed struck a major blow against practices of … Continue reading

Ruth Nicole Brown is an assistant professor of gender and women’s studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the author of Hear Our Truths: The Creative Potential of Black Girlhood. The author talks about her book and the … Continue reading

Erica Lorraine Williams is an assistant professor of anthropology at Spelman College.  She answered some questions about her book Sex Tourism in Bahia: Ambiguous Entanglements. Q: For your book research you attended meetings of the group “Aprosba” in Brazil. What is … Continue reading

On Friday, March 14, 2014, Koritha Mitchell, author of  Living with Lynching:  African American Lynching Plays, Performance, and Citizenship, 1890-1930, spoke at the James Madison Memorial Building of the Library of Congress. At the event Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee presented the author with a … Continue reading

Cheryl Janifer LaRoche is a lecturer in American studies at the University of Maryland. She answered some questions about her book Free Black Communities and the Underground Railroad: The Geography of Resistance. Q: You write that the Underground Railroad is a … Continue reading

On Friday, March 14, 2014, Koritha Mitchell, author of Living with Lynching:  African American Lynching Plays, Performance, and Citizenship, 1890-1930, spoke at the James Madison Memorial Building of the Library of Congress. At the event Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee presented the author … Continue reading