Category Archives: media studies

Robert Miklitsch is a professor in the department of English language and literature at Ohio University. He recently answered some questions about the the Edgar Award-nominated book Kiss the Blood Off My Hands, of which he is the editor. Q: … Continue reading

Some would say Hillary Clinton makes news. But in the national mind it sometimes seems that Hillary Clinton is news, its very personification, an irresistible-to-media hybrid of politico, symbol, and celebrity sentenced to have every action scrutinized and elaborated upon to a … Continue reading

In a century-plus of popular culture, journalists have appeared as cynical scandalmongers, noble crusaders, nicotine-soaked cynics, and the mild-mannered alter egos of super-powered Kryptonians. The latest UIP debut Heroes and Scoundrels covers the whole waterfront of newspersons depicted in our pop … Continue reading

Without Ed Sabol, the Dallas Cowboys might not be known as “America’s Team” and those goofy sports bloopers would not be a staple of rainy weekends. More importantly, the way Americans remember and watch the NFL might be totally different. With imaginative … Continue reading

In 1970, the big three television networks of ABC, CBS and NBC took notice of the feminist movement. The stories on TV news ranged from a patronizing dismissal of feminists to balanced reports on child care needs and employment discrimination. “Television … Continue reading

Bonnie J. Dow is an associate professor and chair of communication studies and an associate professor of women’s and gender studies at Vanderbilt University. She answered some questions about her book Watching Women’s Liberation, 1970: Feminism’s Pivotal Year on the … Continue reading

Today marks the anniversary of the “Heidi Game,” an infamous moment in television history but also part of the story of how far professional football has come in its bid to conquer the zeitgeist. November 17, 1968: the Oakland Raiders score two touchdowns … Continue reading

Dan Schiller is a professor in the Graduate School of Library and Information Science and the Department of Communication at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is answered some questions about his book Digital Depression: Information Technology and Economic Crisis. Q: … Continue reading

Many a high school English student has turned to a video of the 1950s film adaptation of Moby-Dick when faced with writing a report on lengthy sea tale. The plot details may remain mostly the same, but the movie version … Continue reading

Richard C. Crepeau is a professor of history at the University of Central Florida and former president of the North American Society for Sports History. He answered some questions about his new book NFL Football: A History of America’s New … Continue reading