Category Archives: immigration

Pretty much every world religion and ethical system makes a virtue of offering succor to travelers, the rootless, and the persecuted. Immigration, the social-political system we’ve constructed around those ideas, plays a vital role in the narratives of many nations. … Continue reading

Women filing gender-based asylum claims long faced skepticism and outright rejection within the U.S. immigration system. Despite erratic progress, the United States still fails to recognize gender as an established category for experiencing persecution. Gender exists in a sort of … Continue reading

Immigrant transnationalism reminded scholars that migrants, in leaving home for a new life abroad, inevitably tie place of origin and destination together, scholars of transnationalism have also insisted that today’s cross-border connections are unprecedented. This collection of articles by sociologically … Continue reading

The latest e-book in our trendsetting Common Threads series, Immigrant Identity and the Politics of Citizenship draws on decades of scholarship to provide the context for current discussions about immigration, a topic of national importance and without a doubt one of the flash points of … Continue reading

Camille Bégin is a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council postdoctoral fellow at the Centre for Sensory Studies at Concordia University in Montreal. She answered some questions about her book Taste of the Nation: The New Deal Search for America’s Food. Q: What … Continue reading

If you are headed to the Organization of American Historians Annual Meeting in Providence, Rhode Island during April 7-9 there are a few things you’ll want to be on the lookout for courtesy of your friends at UIP. 1) Given … Continue reading

Guenter B. Risse is a professor emeritus of the history of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. He answered some questions about his book Driven by Fear: Epidemics and Isolation in San Francisco’s House of Pestilence. Q: What was the … Continue reading

Kenyon Zimmer is an assistant professor of history at the University of Texas at Arlington. He answered some questions about his book Immigrants against the State: Yiddish and Italian Anarchism in America. Q: Is there a popular conceit that the immigrant anarchists … Continue reading

To judge when an emerging pathogen enters the historical record, we look to medical journals and the Centers for Disease Control. To judge when an emerging pathogen enters the zeitgiest, we look to panicked news reports and conspiracy theorists on … Continue reading

Migrations are in the news again. As happens when humanity goes through one of its giant spasms of violence, displacement follows. People tired of bombs, bullets, hunger, and the rest of a long list of horrors vote with their feet … Continue reading