Category Archives: black studies

Black media pioneer Richard Durham was never an on-air star or featured player. Yet the poet, activist and script writer had a huge influence on how African Americans could be perceived in dramatizations. As Word Warrior: Richard Durham, Radio and … Continue reading

For the month of September 2015, to coincide with the Association for the Study of African American Life and History annual meeting September 23-27 in Atlanta, we have lowered the eBook list price of three titles in the University of Illinois … Continue reading

On August 29, 1920 Charles Parker, Jr. was born in Kansas City, Kansas. As Chuck Haddix writes in Bird: The Life and Music of Charlie Parker, the jazz icon’s launching pad was a home of two faces; an environment that … Continue reading

This day in 1925, activist A. Philip Randolph led the organization of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, a campaign Randolph declared nothing less than “a significant landmark in the history and struggle of the Negro workers in America.” For … Continue reading

Ethelene Whitmire has received  the 2015 Wheatley Book Award for First Nonfiction for her book Regina Anderson Andrews, Harlem Renaissance Librarian. The Wheatly Awards are presented by QBR: The Black Book Review and the Harlem Book Fair and were awarded at a reception in New … Continue reading

As Google has reminded many of you, today marks the birthday of civil rights pioneer, suffragette, anti-lynching activist, and sociologist Ida B. Wells. This remarkable woman participated in many crusades in the Progressive Era of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. … Continue reading

Daisy Turner was a woman of many words. The storyteller and poet was a living repository of history. She related the stories of her own family, from the abduction of her ancestors in West Africa to her own upbringing in … Continue reading

In observance of International Nurses Day, an excerpt from Nursing Civil Rights: Gender and Race in the Army Nurse Corps, by Clarissa J. Threat. Before 1941 African Americans did not ignore the military’s call for nurses. Hoping to participate, black nurses … Continue reading

We are pleased to announce that Appalachian Dance: Creativity and Continuity in Six Communities by Susan Eike Spalding has been awarded the Weatherford Award in non-fiction by Berea College and the Appalachian Studies Association. The award is given to books … Continue reading

The Creolization of American Culture: William Sidney Mount and the Roots of Blackface Minstrelsy by Christopher J. Smith has been awarded the Irving Lowens Book Award by the Society for American Music (SAM). The SAM award committee had this statement upon … Continue reading