Category Archives: black studies

It’s been awhile since I could legitimately sing, “Give me a head with hair/long, beautiful hair.” But the Cowsills, via America’s tribal love-rock musical, expressed the importance of the streamin’, flaxen, waxin’ locks with winning pop harmonies and frequent radio airplay. … Continue reading

Daisy Turner, the shotgun-wielding centenarian, was someone Jane Beck was anxious to meet. Beck, the Executive Director Emeritus and Founder of the Vermont Folklife Center, recounted her first encounter with Daisy Turner on the Vermont PBS program Connect. “First and foremost, she was … Continue reading

Blues All Day Long: The Jimmy Rogers Story by Wayne Everett Goins has been awarded a Certificate of Merit in Historical Research in Blues, Gospel, or R&B in the 2015 Association for Recorded Sound Collections (ARSC) Awards for Excellence. Goins … Continue reading

Winning the War for Democracy: The March on Washington Movement, 1941-1946 by David Lucander has won the 2015 Missouri History Book Award, given by the State Historical Society of Missouri. The award is given to the author of the best … Continue reading

Black media pioneer Richard Durham was never an on-air star or featured player. Yet the poet, activist and script writer had a huge influence on how African Americans could be perceived in dramatizations. As Word Warrior: Richard Durham, Radio and … Continue reading

For the month of September 2015, to coincide with the Association for the Study of African American Life and History annual meeting September 23-27 in Atlanta, we have lowered the eBook list price of three titles in the University of Illinois … Continue reading

On August 29, 1920 Charles Parker, Jr. was born in Kansas City, Kansas. As Chuck Haddix writes in Bird: The Life and Music of Charlie Parker, the jazz icon’s launching pad was a home of two faces; an environment that … Continue reading

This day in 1925, activist A. Philip Randolph led the organization of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, a campaign Randolph declared nothing less than “a significant landmark in the history and struggle of the Negro workers in America.” For … Continue reading

Ethelene Whitmire has received  the 2015 Wheatley Book Award for First Nonfiction for her book Regina Anderson Andrews, Harlem Renaissance Librarian. The Wheatly Awards are presented by QBR: The Black Book Review and the Harlem Book Fair and were awarded at a reception in New … Continue reading

As Google has reminded many of you, today marks the birthday of civil rights pioneer, suffragette, anti-lynching activist, and sociologist Ida B. Wells. This remarkable woman participated in many crusades in the Progressive Era of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. … Continue reading