Category Archives: black studies

Groundbreaking athlete Althea Gibson was born on August 25, 1927. A member of the International Tennis Hall of Fame, Althea Gibson won 11 Grand Slam tournaments. She was also the first black athlete to break the color barrier in international … Continue reading

The release of the film Get On Up in early August rekindled interest in the life and music of James Brown. One of the most staggeringly influential entertainers in American culture, a man for whom we need to invent a … Continue reading

Cheryl Janifer LaRoche‘s book, Free Black Communities and the Underground Railroad, examines the “geography of resistance” and tells the powerful and inspiring story of African Americans ensuring their own liberation in the midst of oppression. LaRoche shows how landscape features, … Continue reading

Economic inequality has been making headlines, and so have mitigating measures like living wage bills, which have passed in several cities. There is no denying the importance of such reforms. But they address only one side —the income side—of hard-pressed … Continue reading

Erica Lorraine Williams visited the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute at Duke University to discuss her book Sex Tourism in Bahia: Ambiguous Entanglements. In her talk, Williams examines the impact of Brazil’s tourism department using Black sexuality to promote their nation … Continue reading

Social activist and influential executive secretary of the National Urban League Eugene Kinckle Jones was born on July 30, 1885. Felix L. Armfield‘s biography Eugene Kinckle Jones: The National Urban League and Black Social Work, 1910-1940 details the life an impact … Continue reading

Darlene Clark Hine, co-editor of The New Black Studies Series, has been awarded with the 2013 National Humanities Medal. President Barack Obama presented the award to Hine at the White House on Monday, July 28. She is one of 10 … Continue reading

Barbara Foley is a professor of English at Rutgers University-Newark. She is the author of Spectres of 1919: Class and Nation in the Making of the New Negro. She answered some questions about her book Jean Toomer: Race, Repression, and Revolution. Q: … Continue reading

Ethelene Whitmire is an associate professor of library and information studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She answered some questions about her book Regina Anderson Andrews, Harlem Renaissance Librarian. Q: Who was Regina Anderson Andrews and what role did she have in … Continue reading

Jimmy Rogers was born James A. Lane on this day in 1924. As Wayne Everett Goins notes in Blues All Day Long, his new biography of Rogers, the legendary guitarist carried a no-nonsense version of how he came to be. … Continue reading