Category Archives: anthropology

Two more authors added their excellent works to the UIP trophy case, a piece of furniture already fill to burstin’ in recent weeks. Christina Sunardi won the Philip Brett Award from the LBTQ Study Group of the American Musicological Society (AMS) for … Continue reading

Scholars increasingly view the arts, creativity, and the creative economy as engines for regenerating global citizenship, renewing decayed local economies, and nurturing a new type of all-inclusive politics. Dia Da Costa delves into the global development, nationalist and leftist/progressive histories … Continue reading

Forbidden Relatives challenges the belief—widely held in the United States—that legislation against marriage between first cousins is based on a biological risk to offspring. In fact, its author maintains, the U.S. prohibition against such unions originated largely because of the … Continue reading

In the following post, Dr. Richa Nagar discusses the importance of politically engaged scholarship for scholar activists in the post-election climate. Dr. Nagar is a professor of gender, women, and sexuality studies at the University of Minnesota and is the … Continue reading

Mwenda Ntarangwi is an associate professor of anthropology at Calvin College. He recently answered some questions about his book The Street Is My Pulpit: Hip Hop and Christianity in Kenya. Q: Your book explores the Kenyan music scene through the lens of … Continue reading

It has been and remains a tumultuous time in Brazil. Of course there was the Rio Olympics, which some feared would fall into debacle under the chaos of the Zika virus and human rights protests. Now, Dilma Rousseff, Brazil’s first female … Continue reading

Gambling. Like all our beloved vices, it is an ancient habit, and probably a prehistoric one. The mighty UIP handicaps some scholarship on the wagering life to get you in the mood for pro football season and the purely friendly betting … Continue reading

Up to 2012, Mali was a poster child for African democracy, despite multiple signs of growing dissatisfaction with the democratic experiment. Then disaster struck, bringing many of the nation’s unresolved contradictions to international attention. A military coup carved off the … Continue reading

Whenever the Olympic Games convene, we remember that the United States shares the planet with other countries. We also remember that many of the world’s people play team handball. At the University of Illinois Press, our authors journey by jet, balloon, donkey, clipper ship, … Continue reading

Christen A. Smith is Assistant Professor of African and African Diaspora Studies and Anthropology at The University of Texas at Austin. Below she answers questions about her book Afro-Paradise: Blackness, Violence, and Performance in Brazil. Q: You first traveled to Salvador in … Continue reading