Category Archives: sports history

Today marks the anniversary of the “Heidi Game,” an infamous moment in television history but also part of the story of how far professional football has come in its bid to conquer the zeitgeist. November 17, 1968: the Oakland Raiders score two touchdowns … Continue reading

Richard C. Crepeau is a professor of history at the University of Central Florida and former president of the North American Society for Sports History. He answered some questions about his new book NFL Football: A History of America’s New … Continue reading

Bobby Riggs had risen to the top of men’s tennis in the 1940s. A longtime promoter of the game with the soul of a pool hall hustler, Riggs used his gifts for hamming it up and good-natured obnoxiousness to set … Continue reading

If you are a football fan and week one of the NFL season has given you an early letdown (we’re looking at you Chicago Bears fans), perhaps some warmly manufactured memories and the soothing tones of John Facenda can smooth over … Continue reading

The casual viewer might not ponder a university press and the manly art of football at the same time. Assuming a scholarly publisher covered sports at all, wouldn’t it devote its energy to obscure ball games played by ancient Mayans, or maybe … Continue reading

Groundbreaking athlete Althea Gibson was born on August 25, 1927. A member of the International Tennis Hall of Fame, Althea Gibson won 11 Grand Slam tournaments. She was also the first black athlete to break the color barrier in international … Continue reading

Nathaniel Grow is an assistant professor of legal studies at the University of Georgia’s Terry College of Business. He answered some questions about his new book Baseball on Trial: The Origin of Baseball’s Antitrust Exemption. Q: Why do you think so many … Continue reading

Illinois Press staff and authors had a great time at the 98th Annual Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) Convention held from October 2-6, 2013 in Jacksonville, Florida. At the conference were a number of … Continue reading

Gaspar “Indio” Ortega appeared on prime-time network television more than almost any other boxer in history. Rising from poverty in his native Tijuana, Mexico, Ortega used his skills in the ring and a sense of showmanship to take the boxing world by … Continue reading

Troy Rondinone’s new book Friday Night Fighter tells the story of Gaspar “Indio” Ortega, who was a hero for many Latin Americans as one of the first Mexicans to appear on national television.  Ortega was a standout in the ring during the Gillette … Continue reading