Category Archives: women’s history

NWSA and University of Illinois Press are pleased to announce the winners of the 2017 First Book Prize! Congratulations to Nicosia M. Shakes who has won first prize for her book  “Gender, Race and Performance Space: Women’s Activism in Jamaican … Continue reading

Yesterday marked the birthday of tennis champion Helen Jacobs. Born in 1908, Jacobs learned her trade in Berkeley, California before going on to a term as the world’s top-ranked player and the winner of nine Grand Slams. Jacobs was best … Continue reading

This is the inaugural post of our new series, Authors on Issues, in which UIP authors weigh in on current events. Valerie Francisco, author of the forthcoming book Labor of Care: Filipina Migrants and Transnational Families in a Global Digital Age, responded … Continue reading

Women Against Abortion: Inside the Largest Moral Reform Movement of the Twentieth Century by Karissa Haugeberg was recently covered in The New York Review of Books in a review essay entitled “The Abortion Battlefield.” The reviewer called the book “excellent” and detailed its … Continue reading

Brittney C. Cooper’s new book Beyond Respectability: The Intellectual Thought of Race Women was recently reviewed on NPR! The reviewer described it “a work of crucial cultural study. . . . [Beyond Respectability] lays out the complicated history of black woman as … Continue reading

Karissa Haugeberg’s book Women Against Abortion: Inside the Largest Moral Reform Movement of the Twentieth Century was recently mentioned in an article in The New Yorker that examines the history of abortion legislation and the anti-abortion movement. Read more here. … Continue reading

Debra A. Shattuck is Provost and Associate Professor of History at John Witherspoon College. She recently answered some questions regarding Bloomer Girls: Women Baseball Pioneers.                                       … Continue reading

The hit film Hidden Figures re-acquainted the zeitgeist with the idea that women in general, and African American women in particular, have long participated in scientific endeavor. Science on the Home Front tells women’s story during the critical years of World War II, when Leona … Continue reading

Emerging in the 1850s, elocutionists recited poetry or drama with music to create a new type of performance. The genre—dominated by women—achieved remarkable popularity. Yet the elocutionists and their art fell into total obscurity during the twentieth century. Today we … Continue reading

You can’t have Women’s History Month without musician-genius Clara Rockmore (left in the photo). The appropriately named Rockmore was a master of the theremin, that haunting/creepy sound-maker that entered our consciousness through 1950s science fiction films, “Good Vibrations,” twentieth-century electronica, and by inspiring the Moog synthesizer. The … Continue reading