Tag Archives: women’s studies

Awards season continues with one of our already-lauded books receiving another prize. L. H. Stallings‘s Funk the Erotic: Transaesthetics and Black Sexual Cultures has won the Alan Bray Memorial Book Award, awarded by the GL/Q Caucus of the Modern Language Association … Continue reading

Holly Welker, author of Baring Witness, recently sat down for a radio interview with the National Public Radio affiliate in Phoenix. Want an enlightening look at the world of Mormon marriage from women’s point of view? Tune in for the in-depth discussion … Continue reading

Women filing gender-based asylum claims long faced skepticism and outright rejection within the U.S. immigration system. Despite erratic progress, the United States still fails to recognize gender as an established category for experiencing persecution. Gender exists in a sort of … Continue reading

In the new UIP release Splattered Ink, Sarah Whitney explores postfeminist gothic, that blockbuster-laden, Oprah-sanctified genre literary that jars readers, rejects happy endings (and beginnings), and finds powerful new ways to talk about violence against women. The genre in particular challenges postfeminist … Continue reading

One of this month’s new UIP releases, Splattered Ink is a bold analysis of postfeminist gothic, a literary genre that continues to jar readers, reject happy endings, and find powerful new ways to talk about violence against women. Sarah E. Whitney … Continue reading

Whenever the Olympic Games convene, we remember that the United States shares the planet with other countries. We also remember that many of the world’s people play team handball. At the University of Illinois Press, our authors journey by jet, balloon, donkey, clipper ship, … Continue reading

One of the pleasures of reading Hillary Clinton in the News is the trip back to yesteryear to see the freaks and embarrassments who made up the American media’s infotainment complex at the turn of the century—and to wonder that … Continue reading

Young people, especially teenagers, are quick to adopt new technology and incorporate that new technology into their every day behavior. These “early adopters” are prized consumers for the tech industry, who are always looking for the next trend on which … Continue reading

Kay Boyle published more than forty books during her life including fifteen novels, and eight volumes of poetry. Yet her achievements can be even better appreciated through her letters to the literary and cultural titans of her time. Sandra Spanier, … Continue reading

The National Women’s Studies Association and the University of Illinois Press are pleased to announce a competition for the best dissertation or first book manuscript by a single author in the field of women’s and gender studies. Applicants must be … Continue reading