Category Archives: southern history

Progressive Era activist and reformer Fannie Barrier Williams was one of the most prominent educated African American women of her generation. A new effort to honor the woman who was a prominent spokesperson for economic, racial, and gender reforms has centered in Williams’ … Continue reading

The Zika virus. It’s making headlines and provoking anxieties. A disease-causing pathogen carried by Aedes mosquitoes—the culprits behind yellow fever, dengue, and chikungunya, among other ills—Zika was isolated in Uganda in the 1940s. Mosquitoes being mosquitoes, and humans having the habit … Continue reading

A Hard Fight for We: Women’s Transition from Slavery to Freedom in South Carolina, by Leslie A. Schwalm African American women fought bravely and tenaciously for their freedom during the Civil War and after. Focusing on slave women on the … Continue reading

Drink bothered the Founding Fathers. Not on a personal level, of course. John Adams drank a tankard of hard cider with his breakfast and George Washington went on many a bender. No, they saw boozing as a threat to the good functioning of … Continue reading

This week marks the anniversary of the death (?) of Elvis Presley, a transformative cultural figure of the twentieth or any other century. If you have memories of that afternoon in 1977, you perhaps recall what you were doing when news of … Continue reading

Daisy Turner was a woman of many words. The storyteller and poet was a living repository of history. She related the stories of her own family, from the abduction of her ancestors in West Africa to her own upbringing in … Continue reading

Cheryl Janifer LaRoche is a lecturer in American studies at the University of Maryland. She answered some questions about her book Free Black Communities and the Underground Railroad: The Geography of Resistance. Q: You write that the Underground Railroad is a … Continue reading

How did African Americans survive the period between 1890 and 1930 when mobs lynched members of their communities and proudly circulated pictures of the mutilated corpses?  How did African Americans maintain a dignified sense of self when photographs of lynch … Continue reading

Stephen Wade’s book, The Beautiful Music All Around Us: Field Recordings and the American Experience has been awarded Best History in the 2013 The Association for Recorded Sound Collections (ARSC) Awards for Excellence category of Best Research in Folk, World, … Continue reading

Larry Eugene Rivers’s recent book Rebels and Runaways: Slave Resistance in Nineteenth-Century Florida has received the Bronze Medal in the Florida Book Awards Nonfiction Category for 2012. Published in July 2012, Rebels and Runaways analyzes the various degrees of slave … Continue reading