Category Archives: American literature

Over the weekend, geek culture daily-must-visit site I09 wrote up UIP’s acclaimed Modern Masters of Science Fiction series. We express thanks for their kind praise. Please have a look at the article.

James T. Farrell’s childhood coincided with a period in history when “real” Americans considered the Irish colorful—and usually undesirable—exotics. His omnibus novel Studs Lonigan and collection Chicago Stories reflected the Irish-American experience of a generation of people who worked themselves to exhaustion, and death, to attain … Continue reading

Two UIP titles are now available in paperback editions. Denise Levertov: A Poet’s Life Called by Kenneth Rexroth “the most subtly skillful poet of her generation,” British-born Denise Levertov authored twenty-four volumes of poetry, four books of essays, and several … Continue reading

Ray Bradbury, born on August 22, 1920, is known for his breakthrough novels such as Fahrenheit 451.  As Jonathan R. Eller writes in Ray Bradbury Unbound, the author also made an impact in television and film. Bradbury only wrote one episode of … Continue reading

Julian Hawthorne hustled. An independent contractor par excellence, the son of Nathaniel Hawthorne reported on foreign wars and domestic politics, published novels, penned short stories, dreamt up theosophist blarney, raked muck, churned out ad copy, and wrote whatever else was … Continue reading

On Friday, March 14, 2014, Koritha Mitchell, author of  Living with Lynching:  African American Lynching Plays, Performance, and Citizenship, 1890-1930, spoke at the James Madison Memorial Building of the Library of Congress. At the event Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee presented the author with a … Continue reading

Harlem Renaissance author Zora Neale Hurston was born on January 7, 1891. Also an American folklorist and anthropologist, Hurston wrote short stories, plays, essays and four novels including Their Eyes Were Watching God. UIP has published a number of projects in relation … Continue reading

Brian Dolinar is a scholar of African American literature and culture from the Depression era. He is the editor of The Negro in Illinois: The WPA Papers. We asked him some questions about this unique project of scholarly recovery.  Q: How … Continue reading

Jared Gardner’s recent University of Illinois Press book, The Rise and Fall of Early American Magazine Culture has been chosen for the EBSCOhost-RSAP (Research Society for American Periodicals) Book Prize for the best book published over the past two years … Continue reading

Koritha Mitchell’s Living with Lynching: African American Lynching Plays, Performance, and Citizenship, 1890-1930, is the Society for the Study of American Women Writers 2012 Book Award Winner. Living with Lynching: African American Lynching Plays, Performance, and Citizenship, 1890–1930 demonstrates that … Continue reading