Little free library 2In honor of Women’s History Month, UIP will be releasing weekly reading lists with some of our favorite women’s history books. We are joining the call to #PressforProgress for gender equality, and we will be updating our Little Free Library, located in the union, weekly! Find out which books will be available by tuning into out blog every week and stop to get a copy of your of your favorite book while you still can!

Our first reading list is….

WOMEN IN POLITICS

LOST IN THE USA: AMERICAN IDENTITY FROM THE PROMISE KEEPERS TO THE MILLION MOM MARCH

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Drawing on thousands of personal testimonials from American citizens, Deborah Gray White unveils American citizens seemingly lost in their own country. While many remember the turn of the millennium as a period of peace and prosperity, White illuminates the many mass protests of the time, forcing readers to reevaluate what motivates individuals to engage in mass protests.

 

 

 

 

WOMEN AGAINST ABORTION: INSIDE THE LARGEST MORAL REFORM MOVEMENT OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY

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Karissa Haugeberg investigates the activism of women’s anti-abortion social reform groups during the second half of the twentieth century. She explores important questions such as the ways people fused religious conviction with partisan politics, activists’ rationalizations for lethal violence, and how women claimed space within an unshakably patriarchal movement.

 

 

 

 

 

NO VOTES FOR WOMEN: THE NEW YORK STATE ANTI-SUFFRAGE MOVEMENT

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Susan Goodier highlights the complicated history of the suffrage movement in New York State by delving into the stories of women who opposed the expansion of voting rights to women. She asserts that women who opposed suffrage were not against women’s rights, but rather that they longed to retain their distinctive feminine identities as protectors of their homes and families.

 

 

 

 

HANDS ON THE FREEDOM PLOW: PERSONAL ACCOUNTS BY WOMEN IN SNCC

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“The stories of the ‘beloved community’ of unknown women in Hands on the Freedom Plow convey a transcendent message of how history can be changed by committed individuals who stand up to what is wrong and live by that old freedom song ‘Ain’t gonna let nobody turn me roun.'”–Essence, Charlayne Hunter-Gault 

 

 

 

 

 

WOMEN AT THE HAGUE: THE INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS OF WOMEN AND ITS RESULTS

HAGUEIn the midst of World War I, from April 28 to May 1, 1915, more than a thousand women from Europe and North America gathered in The Hague to discuss proposals for a peaceful end to the war. Among those daring women were, Jane Addams, Emily G. Balch, and Alice Hamilton, who wrote compellingly about the organizing methods and collaborative spirit of the women’s peace movement, conveying a strong awareness of the responsibility of women to protect the global community from the devastating effects of war.

 

 

 

OUR ROOTS RUN DEEP AS IRONWEED: APPALACHIAN WOMEN AND THE FIGHT FOR ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE

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Shannon Elizabeth Bell recounts the stories of twelve Central Appalachian women fighting for environmental justice in the land they consider home, and what sparked their environmental activism. She argues that these women draw upon a broader “protector identity” that both encompasses and extends the identity of motherhood that has often been associated with grassroots women’s activism.

 

 

 

 

SOUTHERN DISCOMFORT: WOMEN’S ACTIVISM IN TAMPA, FLORIDA, 1880s-1920s

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Nancy A. Hewitt explores the interactions among distinct groups of women in the Cigar City of Tampa, Florida, emphasizing how the women’s activism helped to shape the development of the vibrant, multiethnic city. She considers how the diverse groups of women–native-born, white, African American, Cuban, and Italian immigrant women–created and renegotiated their identities through their social activism.

 

 

 

 

RADICAL SISTERS: SECOND-WAVE FEMINISM AND BLACK LIBERATION IN WASHINGTON, D.C.

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Anne M. Valk rejects the notion of a universal sisterhood, arguing that activists periodically worked to bridge differences for the sake of alleviating women’s plight, even while maintaining distinct political bases. Her book offers a fresh exploration of the ways that 1960s political movements shaped local, grassroots feminism in Washington, D.C.

 

 

 

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