Category Archives: authors

Shilpa Davé writes about the “brown voice” of South Asian characters in tv and on film in her book Indian Accents: Brown Voice and Racial Performance in American Television and Film. Featured on the cover of that book is actor Kal Penn … Continue reading

Inspired by Twitter’s #FollowFriday meme, the final day of the University Press Week Blog Tour is dedicated to things we follow: sub-fields, scholars, new research, popular discussions, etc.  Please read our submission below and check out today’s other University Press Week … Continue reading

On November 6, 1814 Adophe Sax was born in Wallonia, Belgium. Sax invented many musical instruments but the one for which he is best known (and has immortalized his name) is the saxophone. Somewhere along the line musical enthusiasts declared … Continue reading

Ruth Nicole Brown’s book Hear Our Truths: The Creative Potential of Black Girlhood examines how Saving Our Lives Hear Our Truths, or SOLHOT, a radical youth intervention, provides a space for the creative performance and expression of Black girlhood and … Continue reading

Steve Cushing’s book Pioneers of the Blues Revival is a treasure trove for blues fans who want to learn the stories behind such roots music giants as Mississippi John Hurt, Son House and Bukka White. As host of the award-winning … Continue reading

Many a high school English student has turned to a video of the 1950s film adaptation of Moby-Dick when faced with writing a report on lengthy sea tale. The plot details may remain mostly the same, but the movie version … Continue reading

University of Illinois press author and professor of entomology May Berenbaum has been awarded the National Medal of Science. The Medal is the nation’s highest honor for “achievement and leadership in advancing the fields of science and technology.” May Berenbaum’s … Continue reading

The UIP book Beyond the White Negro: Empathy and Anti-Racist Reading by Kimberly Chabot Davis has won the 2014 Lois P. Rudnick Book Prize, sponsored by the New England American Studies Association (NEASA). The book focuses on how white engagement with … Continue reading

David Lucander is a professor of history at SUNY Rockland Community College. He recently answered some questions about his UIP book Winning the War for Democracy: The March on Washington Movement, 1941-1946. Q: What was the March on Washington Movement (MOWM)? … Continue reading

Fannie Barrier Williams: Crossing the Borders of Region and Race by Wanda A. Hendricks has been selected as one of this year’s winners of the Letitia Woods Brown Book Award for best work by a senior scholar. The award is … Continue reading