Category Archives: authors

Between Two Homelands: Letters across the Borders of Nazi Germany provides a glimpse into the everyday lives of one family living during the tumultuous years of World War Two. The book, which was assembled from family letters by Hedda Kalshoven, gives … Continue reading

Ray Bradbury had made his name fusing science fiction with an abiding concern for humanity. What he had done in print, Rod Serling brought to early television. The anthology series The Twilight Zone often worked a Bradburian side of the street … Continue reading

Ray Bradbury, born on August 22, 1920, is known for his breakthrough novels such as Fahrenheit 451.  As Jonathan R. Eller writes in Ray Bradbury Unbound, the author also made an impact in television and film. Bradbury only wrote one episode of … Continue reading

Cheryl Janifer LaRoche‘s book, Free Black Communities and the Underground Railroad, examines the “geography of resistance” and tells the powerful and inspiring story of African Americans ensuring their own liberation in the midst of oppression. LaRoche shows how landscape features, … Continue reading

Simine Short is an aviation historian who has researched and written extensively on the history of motorless flight. Her first book, Glider Mail: An Aerophilatelic Handbook, received numerous research awards worldwide and is considered a standard reference by aerophilatelists and aviation researchers. She … Continue reading

Economic inequality has been making headlines, and so have mitigating measures like living wage bills, which have passed in several cities. There is no denying the importance of such reforms. But they address only one side —the income side—of hard-pressed … Continue reading

Erica Lorraine Williams visited the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute at Duke University to discuss her book Sex Tourism in Bahia: Ambiguous Entanglements. In her talk, Williams examines the impact of Brazil’s tourism department using Black sexuality to promote their nation … Continue reading

Peter Fritzsche is W.D. and Sara E. Trowbridge Professor of History at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and author of Life and Death in the Third Reich and many other books. He translated, from German, the Kalshoven family letters that comprise Between Two … Continue reading

Darlene Clark Hine, co-editor of The New Black Studies Series, has been awarded with the 2013 National Humanities Medal. President Barack Obama presented the award to Hine at the White House on Monday, July 28. She is one of 10 … Continue reading

José Ángel N. is an undocumented immigrant who lives in Chicago. In his memoir Illegal: Reflections of an Undocumented Immigrant, José Ángel writes of his own journey from Mexico to find a new life in America. The crisis of thousands … Continue reading