Category Archives: authors

Many a high school English student has turned to a video of the 1950s film adaptation of Moby-Dick when faced with writing a report on lengthy sea tale. The plot details may remain mostly the same, but the movie version … Continue reading

University of Illinois press author and professor of entomology May Berenbaum has been awarded the National Medal of Science. The Medal is the nation’s highest honor for “achievement and leadership in advancing the fields of science and technology.” May Berenbaum’s … Continue reading

The UIP book Beyond the White Negro: Empathy and Anti-Racist Reading by Kimberly Chabot Davis has won the 2014 Lois P. Rudnick Book Prize, sponsored by the New England American Studies Association (NEASA). The book focuses on how white engagement with … Continue reading

David Lucander is a professor of history at SUNY Rockland Community College. He recently answered some questions about his UIP book Winning the War for Democracy: The March on Washington Movement, 1941-1946. Q: What was the March on Washington Movement (MOWM)? … Continue reading

Fannie Barrier Williams: Crossing the Borders of Region and Race by Wanda A. Hendricks has been selected as one of this year’s winners of the Letitia Woods Brown Book Award for best work by a senior scholar. The award is … Continue reading

Kimberly Chabot Davis is an associate professor of English at Bridgewater State University. She answered some questions about her book Beyond the White Negro: Empathy and Anti-Racist Reading. Q: Where did the term “White Negro” originate? Kimberly Chabot Davis: Since the late 19th … Continue reading

Between Two Homelands: Letters across the Borders of Nazi Germany provides a glimpse into the everyday lives of one family living during the tumultuous years of World War Two. The book, which was assembled from family letters by Hedda Kalshoven, gives … Continue reading

Ray Bradbury had made his name fusing science fiction with an abiding concern for humanity. What he had done in print, Rod Serling brought to early television. The anthology series The Twilight Zone often worked a Bradburian side of the street … Continue reading

Ray Bradbury, born on August 22, 1920, is known for his breakthrough novels such as Fahrenheit 451.  As Jonathan R. Eller writes in Ray Bradbury Unbound, the author also made an impact in television and film. Bradbury only wrote one episode of … Continue reading

Cheryl Janifer LaRoche‘s book, Free Black Communities and the Underground Railroad, examines the “geography of resistance” and tells the powerful and inspiring story of African Americans ensuring their own liberation in the midst of oppression. LaRoche shows how landscape features, … Continue reading